Interview

20 Bank Teller Interview Questions and Answers

Learn what skills and qualities interviewers are looking for from a bank teller, what questions you can expect, and how you should go about answering them.

A teller is the public face of a bank, and as such, needs to be personable, organized, and efficient. They are responsible for providing customer service, processing transactions, and balancing the drawer at the end of their shift.

Because the role of a teller is so important, most banks will require at least one face-to-face interview with a teller candidate. Interview questions will vary depending on the bank, but will likely focus on your customer service skills, your ability to follow procedures, and your knowledge of banking products.

We’ve compiled a list of some of the most common bank teller interview questions and answers to help you prepare.

Why do you want to be a bank teller?

Employers ask this question to learn more about your intentions for applying. They want to know that you are passionate about the role and understand what it entails. When answering, be honest about why you applied. If you have a personal connection to banking or teller work, share that information.

Example: “I’ve always been interested in working with money. I started babysitting when I was 12 years old and saved up all of my earnings. I opened a savings account at a local bank and deposited most of my money there. Ever since then, I knew I wanted to work in a financial institution. I love helping people manage their finances and find ways to save.”

What do you know about this bank?

Employers ask this question to see if you have done your research. They want to know that you are interested in the position and excited about working for their company. Before your interview, make sure you read through the job description and familiarize yourself with the bank’s mission statement, values and goals. You can also learn more about the community it serves and what makes it unique.

Example: “I am very passionate about helping others, so I was thrilled when I saw this opening at a local nonprofit organization. I did some research on the bank and learned that it is one of the oldest banks in the state. It has been serving its community for over 100 years, which is amazing. I love the idea of being part of something that has such a rich history.”

What’s your favorite part of working with the public?

Interviewers ask this question to learn more about your personality and how you interact with others. They want to know if you enjoy working with the public, so they can determine whether or not you would be a good fit for their company. When answering this question, try to focus on what you like most about interacting with customers.

Example: “My favorite part of working with the public is helping people solve problems. I love being able to use my problem-solving skills to help someone who’s having difficulty with something. It makes me feel good when I’m able to make someone’s day better by solving an issue for them.”

Do you have experience working with cash?

This question is an opportunity to show your experience with handling cash and other valuables. It’s also a chance to explain any previous mistakes you’ve made when working with cash, but how you learned from them.

Example: “I have worked as a bank teller for the past five years. I started out in a smaller branch where we only handled cash, so I got plenty of practice counting it and making change. Now that I work at this larger branch, we use more advanced technology, so I don’t handle cash as much anymore. However, I still make sure to count my drawer every day before I leave to ensure everything adds up.”

What’s your experience working in a fast-paced environment?

Working as a bank teller can be quite busy, especially during peak hours. Employers ask this question to make sure you’re comfortable working in an environment where there’s often a lot of activity and customers waiting in line. In your answer, share what strategies you have for staying organized and focused while also being friendly and helpful.

Example: “I’ve worked in fast-paced environments before, including at my previous job as a barista. I find that the best way to stay on top of things is by using organizational tools like checklists and color coding systems. This helps me remember who ordered what and how much they should pay. It also helps me keep track of multiple orders at once. Another strategy I use is asking customers questions about their order so I don’t forget anything.”

Tell me about a time you made a mistake. How did you handle it?

Employers ask this question to see how you respond to challenges. They want to know that you can take responsibility for your actions and learn from them. In your answer, try to explain what steps you took to fix the mistake and prevent it from happening again in the future.

Example: “When I first started working as a bank teller, I was so focused on helping customers that I forgot to count out change for one customer. When they realized there was no change, they became upset with me. After my shift, I counted all of my money and checked my math to make sure I didn’t make the same mistake again. Now, I always double-check my work before handing over any cash.”

Do you feel comfortable working with computers and other banking technology?

Technology is an important part of the banking industry, and employers want to make sure you have experience using computers and other technology. If you don’t have any experience with computers or technology, consider taking a class on these topics before your interview.

Example: “I feel comfortable working with computers and other technology because I’ve been doing it for years. In my last job as a bank teller, I used computers every day to help customers and process transactions. I also use computers at home to manage my finances and pay bills online.”

How do you prioritize tasks on the job?

Bank tellers often have multiple tasks to complete in a day. Employers ask this question to see if you can manage your time well and prioritize the most important tasks first. In your answer, explain how you plan out your workday so that you are able to get everything done on time.

Example: “I always make sure to greet customers as they come into the bank. This is usually my top priority because it helps me build relationships with our clients. I also like to take care of any transactions right away, such as counting money or processing checks. These are essential parts of my job, so I try to do them before anything else. After that, I move onto other tasks based on their importance.”

What do you do if you notice an irregularity in someone’s account?

This question can help the interviewer determine how you handle challenging situations at work. Use your answer to highlight your problem-solving skills and ability to stay calm under pressure.

Example: “If I noticed an irregularity in someone’s account, I would first try to resolve it with them before contacting a manager or supervisor. If they were present, I would ask if there was anything that could have caused the irregularity. If they weren’t present, I would contact their bank representative to find out more information about the irregularity. Once I had all of the relevant information, I would use my knowledge of banking procedures to solve the issue.”

What is your education or experience in finance?

Employers ask this question to learn about your background and how it relates to the position. If you have a degree in finance, include that information in your answer. If you don’t have a degree but have experience working with financial transactions, explain what you’ve done in the past.

Example: “I graduated from college with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. I learned all aspects of accounting and finance while earning my degree, so I am comfortable performing any task related to finances. In addition to my education, I worked as a bank teller for three years before applying for this position.”

Do you have experience working with an angry customer? How did you handle it?

Bank tellers often interact with customers who are frustrated or angry. Employers ask this question to make sure you have experience handling these types of situations and can diffuse them quickly. In your answer, share a specific example of how you handled an upset customer. Explain what steps you took to calm the situation and keep it from escalating.

Example: “In my previous role as a bank teller, I had many experiences working with angry customers. One time, a customer came into the branch looking for help because they were having trouble accessing their online banking account. They became very frustrated when I told them that we couldn’t help them with this issue. Instead of getting defensive, I calmly explained our company policy on online banking issues. This helped the customer understand why I couldn’t help them.”

What do you know about the banking industry?

This question is a great way for employers to see how much you know about the banking industry and what your experience has been. You can use this question as an opportunity to show that you have done some research on the company, their products or services and the banking industry in general.

Example: “I am very passionate about the banking industry because I believe it’s important to understand where our money goes. In my free time, I enjoy reading up on new financial trends and learning more about different investment opportunities. I also think it’s important to stay informed about any changes within the banking industry so I can help customers with questions they may have.”

Have you ever had to deal with a difficult monetary transaction?

Interviewers ask this question to see how you handle challenging situations. They want to know that you can remain calm and professional when faced with a difficult customer. In your answer, share an example of a time where you had to deal with a difficult transaction or client. Explain what steps you took to resolve the situation in a positive way.

Example: “I once had a customer who was upset because I could not give them change for their large bill. The customer became more agitated as I explained our policy on giving out change. Eventually, they left without getting any change. After my shift ended, I went into the bank manager’s office to tell them about the incident. We decided together that we would make an exception to our rule and start handing out smaller bills.”

Tell me about a time you were proud of your work.

Employers ask this question to learn more about your work ethic and how you feel about the job. They want to know that you are proud of what you do, so they can be sure you will take pride in their company as well. When answering this question, think of a time when you were particularly happy with your work or helped someone else.

Example: “I am very proud of my work at my current bank because I have been able to help many people find solutions to their financial problems. I love being able to offer advice and support to customers who need it most. It makes me feel good to know that I am helping them achieve their goals.”

What would you do if you didn’t know how to answer a customer’s question?

Interviewers ask this question to see how you respond to challenges. They want to know that you can use your problem-solving skills and learn new information quickly. In your answer, explain what steps you would take to find the answer for the customer. Show them that you are willing to put in extra effort to help customers.

Example: “If I didn’t know the answer to a customer’s question, I would try my best to find it. If I couldn’t find the answer myself, I would politely ask another employee if they knew the answer. If no one else knew the answer, I would call the manager over so we could figure out the answer together.”

What would you do if you suspected someone of committing fraud?

This question can help interviewers assess your ability to recognize and report suspicious activity. In your answer, explain what steps you would take to ensure the bank’s safety and how you would handle the situation with the customer.

Example: “If I suspected someone of committing fraud, I would first try to get as much information from them as possible. I would ask for their name, address, phone number and other identifying details. Then, I would call our security department to let them know about the potential fraud. If the person was still in the branch, I would keep an eye on them until security arrived. If they left before security got there, I would write down a description of the individual and any distinguishing features so that security could look out for them.”

What are your strategies for resolving conflict?

Bank tellers often work with customers who are experiencing financial difficulties. Employers ask this question to make sure you have the interpersonal skills necessary to help customers in a compassionate and professional manner. In your answer, explain how you would use active listening and problem-solving skills to resolve conflict between customers and bank employees.

Example: “I once had a customer come into my branch upset because they were having trouble accessing their online banking account. I asked them what was wrong and if there was anything else that might be causing the issue. They told me they forgot their password, so I helped them reset it by asking security questions about their previous passwords. Once we got everything back up and running, the customer thanked me for helping them get access to their account.”

How do you stay motivated when working with repetitive tasks?

Bank tellers often perform repetitive tasks throughout the day. Employers ask this question to make sure you have the ability to stay motivated and focused on your work despite performing similar tasks over and over again. In your answer, explain how you keep yourself motivated when working with repetitive tasks. Share a few techniques that help you stay focused and energized while working.

Example: “I find it helpful to take short breaks every hour or so to give myself a chance to stretch my legs and refresh myself. I also try to switch up my routine as much as possible by varying the order in which I do things. For example, instead of always counting out change from largest bills to smallest coins, I’ll sometimes count out change from smallest bills to largest coins. This helps me avoid getting bored with the same tasks.”

What would your strategy be for easing the flow of customers if there was a long line?

Interviewers may ask this question to assess your customer service skills and ability to multitask. In your answer, try to highlight how you would prioritize tasks and communicate with other tellers or managers to ensure customers received the best experience possible.

Example: “If there was a long line at my window, I would immediately begin helping customers in the back of the line while communicating with my fellow tellers about who could help which customers. This way, we can ensure that no one is waiting too long for assistance. If it’s an especially busy day, I might also suggest taking turns so everyone gets a break.”

How do you handle stress or anxiety at work?

Bank tellers often work with customers who are in a rush or frustrated. Employers ask this question to make sure you have the right personality for the job. They want someone who can remain calm and friendly even when things get hectic. In your answer, share how you stay positive under pressure. Explain that you enjoy helping people and find it rewarding to solve their problems.

Example: “I love working as a bank teller because I enjoy interacting with people. When I’m stressed out, I remind myself of why I got into this career. It’s because I like making others happy and solving their problems. If someone is upset, I try my best to listen to them and help them feel better. I’ve found that if I am kind and patient, they usually calm down and leave satisfied.”

Previous

16 Server Interview Questions and Answers

Back to Interview
Next

20 Project Coordinator Interview Questions and Answers