Resume

EHS Manager Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this EHS Manager resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Environmental health and safety (EHS) managers are tasked with protecting employees, customers, and the environment from potential hazards. They monitor compliance with regulations, identify and resolve potential risks, and help implement effective risk management strategies.

If you’re looking for a job that combines your passion for environmentalism with your love of management, then an EHS manager position might be just the right fit for you. Follow these tips and resume example to write a compelling EHS manager resume that hiring managers will love.

David Moore
New York City, NY | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Seasoned EHS Manager with over 10 years of experience in environmental health and safety. Proven ability to develop and implement safety programs that protect employees and comply with government regulations. Skilled in loss prevention, incident investigation, and emergency response.

Education
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Jun '10
M.S. in Environmental Science and Health
Wesleyan University Jun '06
B.A. in Environmental Studies
Experience
Company A, EHS Manager Jan '17 – Current
  • Managed a team of EHS professionals to ensure compliance with all applicable laws, regulations and company policies related to environmental health and safety (EHS) in the workplace.
  • Developed and implemented programs that promote awareness of hazards within the facility as well as provide training on hazard recognition, control, abatement, emergency response procedures and other aspects of EHS management.
  • Assisted with development of site-specific EHS plans for new facilities or expansions to existing facilities by providing technical expertise regarding potential risks associated with specific processes or products manufactured at each location.
  • Provided support for audits conducted by regulatory agencies such as OSHA, EPA, etc., including preparation for inspections prior to their arrival and follow up after an inspection has been completed.
  • Coordinated activities between internal departments involved in implementing corrective actions when violations are identified during an audit or investigation process through coordination meetings with appropriate personnel from affected areas/departments.
Company B, EHS Manager Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Implemented a new safety program that reduced OSHA violations by 50% and improved employee morale
  • Conducted regular EHS audits to ensure compliance with all regulations, reducing fines by 80%
  • Managed the environmental health and safety budget of $1M for regulatory compliance purposes
  • Reduced waste in the manufacturing process by implementing an effective recycling program
  • Spearheaded a comprehensive ergonomic risk assessment that increased productivity 15%
Company C, EHS Coordinator Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Ensured environmental, health and safety (EHS) compliance with established guidelines and regulations including maintaining a safe work environment in accordance2 with all applicable laws and regulations.
  • Provided EHS training to employees and contractors on chemical hazards found at the facility as well as general awareness of personal protective equipment requirements for working around hazardous chemicals.
  • Coordinated emergency response drills to ensure maximum efficiency of all stakeholders during an actual emergency incident involving dangerous goods or radiation exposure.
Certifications
  • Certified Safety Professional (CSP)
  • Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH)
  • Professional Engineer (PE)
Skills

Industry Knowledge: OSHA, EPA, ISO 14001, Hazardous Material Handling, First Aid, Fire Safety, Environmental Protection
Technical Skills: Microsoft Office Suite, Health and Safety Regulations
Soft Skills: Communication, Teamwork, Problem Solving, Leadership

How to Write an EHS Manager Resume

Here’s how to write an ehs manager resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

Bullet points are the most important part of your resume because they’re the first thing recruiters and hiring managers will read. And they’re the best way to showcase your experience and qualifications.

So it’s important to use them to their full potential. And that means using them to describe your accomplishments and results. So rather than saying you “managed EHS department,” you could say you “led team of 15 engineers to achieve 15% reduction in OSHA incidents over 18-month period.”

The second bullet point is much stronger because it provides specific details about what you did and the results of your work.

Related: What Is an EHS Manager? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

When you submit your resume for an EHS manager role, it’s likely that it will be scanned by an applicant tracking system (ATS) for certain keywords. This system looks for specific terms related to the job, like “environmental health” or “safety management,” in order to determine whether your skills and experience are a match for the position. If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right keywords, the ATS might automatically reject your application.

To increase your chances of getting an interview, use this list of commonly used EHS manager keywords as a starting point to help you identify the skills and experience that are most relevant to the role:

  • Environmental Health and Safety (EHS)
  • Environmental Awareness
  • Occupational Health
  • Hazardous Waste Management
  • Environmental Management Systems
  • Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS)
  • ISO 14001
  • Industrial Hygiene
  • Environmental Compliance
  • Environmental Protection
  • Continuous Improvement
  • Hazard Assessment
  • Ergonomics
  • Environment & Safety
  • Health & Safety
  • Risk Assessment
  • OSHA
  • U.S. EPA
  • Environmental Regulations
  • Waste Management
  • U.S. EPA Certified
  • Good Environmental Practice (GMP)
  • Hazardous Materials
  • Hazard Recognition
  • Noise Control
  • Water Safety
  • Operational Safety
  • Emergency Management
  • Safety Management Systems
  • Occupational Health & Safety

Showcase Your Technical Skills

In order to be successful in this role, it is essential that EHS managers are proficient in a variety of technical systems and procedures. Recruiters are looking for EHS managers who are skilled in programs like Microsoft Office Suite, ERP systems, and manufacturing software. Additionally, it is important that EHS managers are familiar with government regulations related to their industry, as they will often be responsible for ensuring that the organization is in compliance with these regulations.

Related: How Much Does an EHS Manager Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re crafting your resume, it’s important to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Create Scannable Sections

There are a few things you can do to make your resume easier to read and understand quickly. Aligning everything to the left, using a standard font type and size, and keeping bullets under 2 lines will help make your resume more skimmable. You should also try to leave some white space on the page to help the recruiter easily scan through your information.

Be Concise

Ideally, a resume should only be one page long. If you have a lot of experience to include, you can go up to two pages, but make sure to focus on the most relevant and recent experience. In general, you want to be succinct and get your point across quickly, so brevity is key. When in doubt, less is more.

Check Your Work

Proofreading your resume is important for ensuring that it looks its best. Make sure to spellcheck your resume for mistakes, and have a friend or family member proofread it for you to catch any other errors. capitalize all proper nouns, and be consistent in your use of tense and punctuation.

Consider a Summary

When it comes to resumes, a well-crafted summary statement can be extremely helpful in getting your experience and intentions across to potential employers. A summary statement is a brief paragraph at the top of your resume that explains who you are, what you do, and what you’re looking for. This can be an extremely useful way to bridge the gap between your past experience and future goals, and can help potential employers to better understand how your skills might translate into the role you’re hoping to land. If you’re unsure of how to go about writing a summary statement, or you’re not sure what to include, there are a few helpful tips that can guide you in the right direction.

When creating your summary statement, start by explaining who you are. This can include your name, your job title, and a brief overview of your experience. Next

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