Job Search

16 Jobs You Can Do With a Forensic Science Degree

Knowing what you can do with a Forensic Science degree is an important step in finding a career. Check out this list of 16 jobs you can do with a degree in Forensic Science.

When you’re considering a degree in forensic science, you might be picturing yourself working in a lab, analyzing evidence, and helping to solve crimes. And while that’s certainly one possible career path, it’s far from the only one.

In fact, forensic science is a relatively new and rapidly growing field, which means there are a lot of opportunities for those with a forensic science degree to find work in a variety of industries.

So if you’re considering a degree in forensic science, know that you have a lot of options when it comes to your career. Read on to learn about some of the most popular careers for those with a forensic science degree.

Forensic scientist

Forensic scientists apply scientific methods to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence related to criminal cases. They use their knowledge of chemistry, biology, physics, and other sciences to identify, process, and analyze evidence. Forensic scientists typically specialize in one of three areas: trace evidence, biology, or chemistry.

Forensic science is a great career for those interested in using science to solve crimes. It is a challenging and exciting field that offers the opportunity to work on interesting cases and have a direct impact on the criminal justice system. Forensic scientists use their skills to help solve crimes, and their work can have a profound impact on the lives of victims and their families.

Forensic toxicologist

Forensic toxicologists analyze samples taken from human remains to determine the cause of death. They use their knowledge of chemistry and biology to identify and quantify the presence of toxins in a person’s body. Forensic toxicologists work in crime laboratories and must be able to communicate their findings to police, lawyers, and other professionals.

This is a great career for forensic science majors because it allows them to use their scientific skills to solve crimes. Forensic toxicologists must be able to think critically and solve complex problems. They must also be able to communicate their findings to non-scientific professionals.

Firearms and toolmarks examiner

A firearms and toolmarks examiner is responsible for examining firearms and toolmarks to determine if they match a particular suspect. They use a variety of methods to examine firearms and toolmarks, including microscopes, lasers, and other forensic tools. They also work with other forensic scientists to determine the cause of death in cases where firearms are involved.

This is a great career for forensic science majors because it allows them to use their skills in forensic science to solve crimes. It is a challenging job that requires critical thinking and attention to detail, but it can be very rewarding.

Trace evidence analyst

Trace evidence analysts are forensic scientists who specialize in the identification and analysis of very small pieces of evidence that can link a suspect to a crime scene. This type of evidence can include hair, fibers, glass, paint, soil, and other minute materials. Trace evidence analysts use a variety of techniques, including microscopy, to examine and compare samples.

Trace evidence analysis is a critical part of many criminal investigations, as even the smallest piece of evidence can make a big difference. If you’re interested in a career in forensic science, trace evidence analysis is a great option. It’s a challenging field that requires keen attention to detail, strong analytical skills, and a passion for justice.

DNA analyst

A DNA analyst uses their scientific knowledge to examine and analyze DNA samples in order to help solve crimes. They may work in a crime lab, assisting police detectives and other law enforcement officials in their investigations. A DNA analyst’s job is to examine evidence and provide scientific analysis and interpretation of the results.

A DNA analyst must have a strong foundation in biology and chemistry, as well as a keen eye for detail. They must be able to work independently and be able to think critically in order to solve complex problems. A DNA analyst must also be able to communicate their findings to others, as they will often be required to testify in court.

A DNA analyst is a vital member of a forensic science team and can help solve crimes that would otherwise go unsolved. If you are interested in a career in forensic science, then a job as a DNA analyst may be a good fit for you.

Bloodstain pattern analyst

Bloodstain pattern analysts (BPA) are forensic science professionals who use their knowledge of bloodstain patterns to help solve crimes. They collect and analyze bloodstain evidence from crime scenes, and their findings can be used to determine the type of crime that was committed, the location of the crime, and the identity of the perpetrator.

BPAs need to have a strong understanding of physics and math in order to accurately interpret bloodstain patterns. They must be able to think critically and solve problems, as their work often requires them to piece together clues from various sources. Good communication and writing skills are also essential, as BPAs often have to present their findings in court.

If you’re interested in a career in forensic science, becoming a bloodstain pattern analyst is a great option. It’s a highly specialized field, so you’ll need to have a strong foundation in the sciences, but it can be a very rewarding career.

Crime scene investigator

Crime scene investigators (CSIs) are responsible for investigating crimes by collecting and analyzing physical evidence. They document and collect evidence at crime scenes, which can include fingerprints, bloodstains, DNA, and other trace evidence. CSIs use a variety of scientific methods and tools to examine evidence, and they often work closely with law enforcement officers, detectives, and prosecutors.

A career as a CSI can be exciting and challenging, and it’s a great way to use your forensic science skills and knowledge. You’ll need to be detail-oriented and have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. You’ll also need to be able to communicate effectively, both in writing and verbally, as you’ll be presenting your findings to others.

To become a CSI, you’ll need to have at least a bachelor’s degree in forensic science or a related field. Many CSIs also have experience working in a laboratory, and some have advanced degrees.

Digital forensics analyst

A digital forensics analyst is responsible for investigating and analyzing digital data in order to support or refute a hypothesis in a criminal or civil case. In order to do this, they must have a strong understanding of computer science, information technology, and the law.

This is a great career for forensic science majors because it allows them to use their scientific skills to solve crimes and help people. It is a challenging and ever-changing field, which means that there is always something new to learn. Additionally, digital forensics analysts often have a great deal of autonomy in their work, which can be very satisfying.

To become a digital forensics analyst, you will need to have at least a bachelor’s degree in forensic science or a related field. Many employers also prefer candidates who have experience working in law enforcement or the legal system.

Polygraph Examiner

A polygraph examiner uses a polygraph machine to test subjects in order to determine if they are telling the truth. The polygraph machine measures things like heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration to look for signs of stress that could indicate deception. Polygraph examiners typically work in law enforcement, but they may also work in private companies or for the government.

This is a good career for forensic science majors because it allows them to use their skills in investigation and analysis to help solve crimes. Polygraph examiners must be able to pay close attention to detail and be able to maintain their composure in high-pressure situations. They must also be able to communicate their findings clearly and concisely.

Forensic psychiatrist

Forensic psychiatrists are medical doctors who have completed a residency in psychiatry and have also received specialized training in forensic psychiatry. They work with law enforcement, the courts, and other legal professionals to provide expert testimony and psychological evaluations in criminal and civil cases.

Forensic psychiatrists use their knowledge of mental health and the law to help solve crimes and protect the public. They often work with victims and offenders to understand the psychological factors that may have contributed to a crime. Forensic psychiatrists may also be called upon to provide expert testimony in court cases or to evaluate a person’s mental state to determine whether they are competent to stand trial.

A career in forensic psychiatry is a good fit for those who are interested in both psychology and the law. It is a demanding field, but it can be very rewarding to use your skills to help solve crimes and protect the public.

Autopsy Assistant

Autopsy assistants work with medical examiners to perform autopsies and determine the cause of death. They collect and document evidence, take photographs, and prepare tissue samples for further analysis. In some cases, they may also testify in court about their findings.

Autopsy assistants need to have a strong understanding of human anatomy and physiology, as well as knowledge of forensic science techniques. They must be able to work with precision and detail, as well as maintain a high level of professionalism and confidentiality.

This job is a good fit for forensic science majors because it allows them to use their knowledge to help solve crimes and bring justice to families. It is a demanding job that requires precision and attention to detail, but it can be very rewarding.

Fraud investigator

Fraud investigators are responsible for conducting investigations into suspected cases of fraud. They collect and analyze evidence, interview witnesses and suspects, and prepare reports detailing their findings. In some cases, they may also testify in court.

Fraud investigators need to have strong analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as excellent communication and writing skills. They must be able to pay close attention to detail and be comfortable working with sensitive and confidential information.

Forensic science majors are well-suited for fraud investigator roles, as they have the necessary skills and training to conduct thorough and accurate investigations. In addition, forensic science majors learn how to present their findings in a clear and concise manner, which is essential for fraud investigators who may need to testify in court.

Laboratory Analyst

A laboratory analyst uses their scientific knowledge to help solve crimes. They analyze evidence from crime scenes, such as blood, hair, and fingerprints, and use this information to identify suspects and help build cases. They may also testify in court as an expert witness.

This job is a good fit for forensic science majors because it allows them to use their scientific skills to help solve crimes. They get to work with law enforcement officials and use their knowledge to help bring criminals to justice. This job also requires strong communication and writing skills, as laboratory analysts must be able to write detailed reports of their findings.

To become a laboratory analyst, you will need to earn a bachelor’s degree in forensic science. Some jobs may also require you to have a master’s degree. You will also need to complete an internship or have related work experience.

Private investigator

A private investigator is a professional who is hired to conduct investigations, usually for individuals or businesses. They may be hired to find missing persons, gather evidence for legal cases, or investigate suspected crimes. Private investigators often have a background in law enforcement or a related field, such as forensic science.

Private investigators use a variety of skills to do their job, including research, surveillance, and interrogation. They must be able to write reports and present their findings to clients. They must also be able to work independently and have good problem-solving skills.

If you’re interested in a career as a private investigator, you should have a bachelor’s degree in forensic science or a related field. You may also need to have experience working in law enforcement or as a private investigator. Some states require private investigators to be licensed.

Criminal Intelligence Analyst

A criminal intelligence analyst is a professional who uses their skills in research, data analysis, and critical thinking to support law enforcement agencies in their efforts to solve and prevent crimes. As a criminal intelligence analyst, you will collect and analyze data from a variety of sources, including crime reports, police records, and intelligence databases. You will use your findings to identify patterns and trends in criminal activity, which will help law enforcement agencies to target their resources more effectively.

This is a great career for forensic science majors because it allows you to use your skills in research and data analysis to support the work of law enforcement agencies. You will have the opportunity to use your critical thinking skills to identify patterns and trends in criminal activity, and your work will help to make your community a safer place.

Homeland security specialist

Homeland security specialists work to protect the United States and its citizens from terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other emergencies. They collect and analyze intelligence, develop security plans, conduct security assessments, and coordinate with law enforcement and other agencies to respond to threats.

Forensic science majors are well suited for this career, as they have the necessary skills to collect and analyze evidence, identify patterns, and draw conclusions from data. They also have a strong understanding of the law, which is important in this field.

Homeland security specialists must be able to think critically and work well under pressure. They must also be able to communicate effectively, as they will often be working with people from other agencies and departments.

This is a demanding career, but it is also very rewarding. Those who choose this career can take pride in knowing that they are helping to keep their country safe.

Previous

18 Jobs You Can Do With a Creative Writing Degree

Back to Job Search