Resume

Janitor Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Janitor resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Janitors are the unsung heroes of the workplace. They’re the people who make sure the office is clean and well maintained, while also keeping it safe and secure. They’re the first people you see when you walk into the building, and they’re the last people you see when you leave for the day.

The best janitors are hardworking, detail-oriented individuals who love being part of a team. They’re willing to do whatever it takes to keep their organization running smoothly, from scrubbing toilets to emptying trash cans. If you’re looking for a stable, secure job with lots of opportunities for growth, then becoming a janitor could be the right choice for you.

Here are some tips and an example to help write your own stellar janitor resume.

James Smith
Houston, TX | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Hardworking janitor with 10+ years of experience in the industry. Consistently recognized for going above and beyond to keep facilities clean and tidy. Eager to join a team that values a strong work ethic and takes pride in their work.

Education
James Madison High School Jun '08
High School Diploma
Experience
Company A, Janitor Jan '17 – Current
  • Cleaned and maintained the building, including vacuuming carpets, mopping floors, dusting furniture, cleaning bathrooms, windows, etc.
  • Assisted with moving of office equipment as needed to ensure proper flow within the facility.
  • Maintained a clean and organized work area at all times by sorting trash from recycling materials and disposing of waste in appropriate containers.
  • Performed other duties as assigned such as delivering mail or copying documents when necessary.
  • Followed safety procedures for handling chemicals and used personal protective equipment (PPE) when required by regulations or job tasks performed.
Company B, Janitor Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Cleaned and sanitized restrooms, including sweeping and mopping floors, cleaning sinks and toilets, emptying trash cans, and stocking paper towels
  • Swept and vacuumed common areas of office building daily; emptied garbage in receptacles outside the building
  • Dusted interior windowsills weekly to prevent dust buildup on window panes
  • Vacuumed carpets once a week using upright commercial vacuum cleaner with attachments for upholstery cleaning
  • Maintained cleanliness of kitchen area by washing dishes after each meal service (daily)
Company C, Custodian Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Cleaned and maintained office, classrooms, hallways, cafeteria and athletic facilities.
  • Maintained a clean work area by disposing of trash daily; reported maintenance issues to supervisors for prompt attention.
  • Moved furniture as directed during room set-up/take-down in preparation for school activities such as dances or assemblies; assisted teachers with classroom tasks as needed.
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Janitorial, Pressure Washing, Programming, HVAC, Carpentry, Electrical, Plumbing, Painting, Security
Technical Skills: Preventative Maintenance, Safety, Risk Assessment, Problem solving, Troubleshooting, Attention to Detail, Multi-Tasking
Soft Skills: Communication, Teamwork, Initiative, Leadership, Resourcefulness, Motivation, Self-Motivation

How to Write a Janitor Resume

Here’s how to write a janitor resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

Bullet points are the most important part of your resume because they’re the first thing recruiters and hiring managers will read. And they’re the best way to showcase your experience and qualifications.

So it’s important to use them to their full potential. And that means using them to describe your accomplishments and results. So rather than saying you “cleaned floors,” you could say you “cleaned floors and maintained cleanliness of office space by using cleaning products to remove stains and dirt from tile and carpeted floors.”

The second bullet point is much more specific and descriptive—and it provides more detail about what exactly you did and how you did it.

Related: What Is a Janitor? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

Applicant tracking systems (ATS) are used to scan resumes for certain keywords in order to determine whether or not an applicant is a good fit for the job opening. If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right keywords, your application might not be seen by the hiring manager.

To make sure this doesn’t happen, it’s important to include keywords in your resume, especially if you’re applying for a job as a janitor. Chances are that the ATS will be looking for terms like “housekeeping” and “cleaning.” But you should also try to use more general keywords like “organizational skills” and “people skills” to increase your chances of getting an interview.

Here are some of the most commonly used janitorial keywords:

  • Cleaning
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • Organization Skills
  • Time Management
  • Food Service
  • Customer Service
  • Social Media
  • Public Speaking
  • Microsoft Access
  • IBM SPSS
  • Negotiation
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Leadership
  • Marketing
  • Cooperation
  • Research
  • Hygiene
  • Problem Solving
  • Housekeeping
  • Sanitation
  • AutoCAD
  • Landscaping
  • Community Outreach
  • Maintenance
  • Customer Satisfaction
  • Maintenance Management
  • Lawn Care
  • Warehouse Operations
  • Lawn Maintenance

Related: How Much Does a Janitor Make?

Remember The Basics

As you draft your resume, you’ll want to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Create Easy-to Scan Sections

There are a few things you can do to make your resume easier to read and understand quickly. Aligning everything to the left, using a standard font type and size, and keeping bullets under 2 lines will help make your resume more skimmable. You should also try to leave some white space on the page to help the recruiter easily scan through your information.

Be Concise

A resume should be as concise as possible while still highlighting your relevant experience and skills. A one-page resume is ideal, but a two-page resume is acceptable for more experienced candidates. When trimming down your resume, focus on removing irrelevant information and streamlining the content.

Check Your Work

Proofreading your resume is an important step in ensuring that it looks its best. There are a few key things to watch for when proofreading: spelling mistakes, punctuation mistakes, and grammatical mistakes. It is also important to be aware of easily confused words. Spell-checking your resume is a good way to catch mistakes, but it is important to have someone else read it over as well.

Use a Summary

If you’re looking for a new job, a resume summary statement can be a great way to introduce yourself and highlight the skills that make you the best candidate for the role. Your summary should be concise and easy to read, and should focus on your skills, experiences, and goals. When done well, a summary can help to paint a fuller picture of who you are and what you can offer.

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