Resume

Librarian Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Librarian resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Librarians are information experts. They help people find what they’re looking for by organizing and providing access to books, journals, electronic resources, and more. And because information is constantly evolving, librarians are often on the forefront of new trends.

If you’re a people person who loves helping others and staying on top of trends, you might be ready to break into this rewarding field. But before you can land your dream job as a librarian, you need a resume that will get you noticed. Here are some tips plus an example to help you write yours.

David Moore
Houston, TX | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Driven information professional with eight years of experience in public and academic libraries. Demonstrated expertise in reference, instruction, and collection development. Passionate about user experience and developing innovative services that make it easy for people to find and use the information they need.

Education
University of Texas at Austin Jun '10
M.L.I.S.
University of Texas at Austin Jun '06
B.A. in English
Experience
Company A, Librarian Jan '17 – Current
  • Managed the library’s collection of over 100,000 items and ensured that all materials were organized according to established standards for easy access by patrons.
  • Provided reference services in person or via phone/email to help students find information on assignments and projects.
  • Assisted with planning and implementing programs such as book clubs, author visits, etc., which encourage reading among students.
  • Maintained a website presence for the library including updating content regularly and creating new pages when needed.
  • Participated in professional development opportunities related to libraries and technology as well as participated in committees within the school community where appropriate.
Company B, Librarian Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Created a database of all the books in the library and their locations, which helped patrons find what they were looking for more quickly
  • Maintained an inventory of all materials in the library, ensuring that nothing was lost or stolen from the collection
  • Assisted students with research papers and guided them to appropriate resources when necessary
  • Collaborated with faculty on campus to create new collections based on student demand
  • Tracked usage statistics and created reports detailing how people used the library’s resources over time
Company C, Library Assistant Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Assisted patrons with locating materials and using the library’s online catalog and other resources.
  • Checked materials in and out for patrons, and processed interlibrary loan requests.
  • Maintained the library’s collections by weeding outdated or damaged materials and ordering new materials as needed.
Certifications
  • Master of Library Science
  • Certified Library Media Specialist
  • School Library Media Specialist
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Library Sciences, Library Cataloging, Library Management, Library Public Relations
Technical Skills: Windows, ILS, Library OPAC, Library ILS, Library OPAC, Library Management, Library Cataloging, Library Public Relations
Soft Skills: Communication, Teamwork, Attention to Detail, Problem Solving, Organization

How to Write a Librarian Resume

Here’s how to write a librarian resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

Bullet points are the most effective way to showcase your experience and qualifications. And the best way to do that is by using specific examples and numbers.

For example, rather than saying you “managed library resources,” you could say that you “managed library resources for more than 10,000 students and faculty, ensuring that all had access to the resources they needed to succeed.”

The second bullet point is much stronger because it provides specific details about the project and the outcome. It also includes a quantifiable result—more than 10,000 people benefited from the project—which makes it easy for the reader to understand the significance of the work.

Related: What Is a Librarian? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

When you apply for a librarian role, your resume is likely to be scanned by an applicant tracking system (ATS) for certain keywords. This program will look for terms related to the position, like “acquisition” or “cataloging” in order to determine whether your skills and experience are a match for the job. If you don’t have enough relevant keywords on your resume, the ATS might discard your application.

To make sure your resume makes it past the ATS, use this list of common librarian keywords as a starting point:

  • Library Services
  • Library Science
  • Information Literacy
  • Library Instruction
  • Library Management
  • Cataloging
  • Electronic Resources
  • Library Research
  • Library Reference
  • Collection Development
  • Collection Management
  • Higher Education
  • Academic Libraries
  • Public Libraries
  • Web Applications
  • Community Outreach
  • Academic Research
  • Information Retrieval
  • Higher Education Administration
  • Public Speaking
  • Instructional Design
  • eLearning
  • Distance Learning
  • Staff Development
  • Digital Libraries
  • E-Learning Standards
  • Educational Technology
  • Learning Management Systems
  • Research
  • Library Information Services

Showcase Your Technical Skills

As a librarian, you are responsible for helping patrons find the information they need. And in order to do that, you need to be proficient in the use of technology. Some of the most common programs librarians use are library management software, reference databases, and search engines. Additionally, librarians need to be familiar with the principles of information architecture in order to organize and present information in a way that is easy for patrons to understand.

So if you have experience with any of these programs or platforms, be sure to list them on your resume. And if you’re not familiar with them, now is the time to learn them!

Related: How Much Does a Librarian Make?

Remember The Basics

As you draft your resume, you’ll want to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make Your Resume Easy to Scan

There are a few things you can do to make your resume easier to read, such as left aligning your text, using a standard font type and size, and using bullets instead of paragraphs to list your experiences. You should also use all-caps and bold sparingly, and keep your bullets under two lines. Additionally, you can include some white space on the page to make the document easier to scan.

Be Concise

A resume should be as concise as possible, focusing on the most relevant information. It should typically be one page long if you are a recent graduate or have less than five to eight years of professional experience. If you have more experience than that, a two-page resume is more appropriate. When trimming down a resume, remove irrelevant information, filler words, and unnecessary details.

Proofread

Proofreading your resume is one of the most important steps in ensuring that it is effective and error-free. Spell checking is a must, as are punctuation and grammar checks. It is also helpful to have someone else proofread your resume for you, as they may catch mistakes that you have missed. Beware of easily confused words, and make sure that your tense is consistent throughout the resume.

Use a Summary

As a job seeker, writing a resume can be a daunting task. One way to make your experience more understandable and your goals more apparent is to use a resume summary statement. This is a brief paragraph (no more than three sentences) that introduces who you are, what you do, and what you’re looking to do next. This can be an extremely helpful way to contextualize your experience and make it more relevant to the role you’re applying for. Soft skills, transferable experiences, and future goals should all be taken into account when writing your summary statement. When done well, this paragraph can be an extremely effective way to market yourself to potential employers.

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