Resume

Marketing Manager Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Marketing Manager resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Marketing managers are responsible for overseeing an organization’s marketing efforts—from planning and executing campaigns to building strong relationships with customers. They’re usually the first point of contact for new customers and the last for existing ones.

Because marketing managers work with so many different departments across an organization, they need to be great communicators who can build consensus among stakeholders with different perspectives. They also need to be able to think strategically about how best to allocate resources to meet business goals.

Here are some tips and an example to help you write a marketing manager resume that will land you interviews in this competitive field.

David Moore
Houston, TX | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Driven marketing manager with over 10 years of experience in B2B and B2C industries. Proven success in developing and executing marketing plans, managing budgets, and building brands. Excels at creating compelling content, driving website traffic, and generating leads.

Education
Southern Methodist University Jun '10
M.B.A. in Marketing
Southern Methodist University Jun '06
B.S. in Business Administration
Experience
Company A, Marketing Manager Jan '17 – Current
  • Managed the development of a new product launch, including market research and competitor analysis to determine pricing strategy.
  • Developed an integrated marketing plan that included digital advertising, social media campaigns, trade shows, and public relations efforts to support the sales team in achieving their goals for the fiscal year.
  • Created a comprehensive budget based on projected revenue and expenses related to this project as well as other projects within my portfolio.
  • Oversaw all aspects of production from concept through delivery with vendors such as graphic designers, web developers, etc., ensuring adherence to budgets and timelines set by management.
  • Collaborated with internal departments (sales & operations) to ensure proper execution of plans across multiple channels while maintaining brand consistency throughout all touch points with customers/prospects.
Company B, Marketing Manager Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Managed all aspects of the digital marketing campaign, including SEO and PPC campaigns, email marketing and social media
  • Collaborated with sales team to create lead generation strategies that increased qualified leads by 30%
  • Spearheaded a new product launch campaign that generated over $1M in revenue for the company’s top-selling product line
  • Increased website traffic by 20% through strategic partnerships with local businesses and organizations
  • Created an affiliate program that grew online sales by 40% within its first year of operation
Company C, Marketing Assistant Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Wrote and edited marketing collateral such as brochures, website content, whitepapers, etc.
  • Coordinated with vendors to ensure timely delivery of marketing materials.
  • Assisted in the planning and execution of marketing campaigns and events.
Certifications
  • Certified Marketing Manager
  • Digital Marketing Certification
  • Social Media Marketing Certification
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Digital Marketing, SEO, SEM, Social Media Marketing, Content Marketing, Email Marketing, Affiliate Marketing
Technical Skills: Hootsuite, Sprout Social, Google Analytics, Google AdWords, Facebook Ads Manager, LinkedIn Ads
Soft Skills: Communication, Leadership, Creativity, Strategic Thinking, Problem Solving, Time Management, Organization

How to Write a Marketing Manager Resume

Here’s how to write a marketing manager resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

Bullet points are the most important part of your resume because they’re the first thing recruiters and hiring managers will see. And they’re the best way to showcase your experience and qualifications.

So it’s important to use them to their full potential. And that means using them to describe your accomplishments and results. So rather than saying you “managed marketing campaigns,” you could say you “managed marketing campaigns for new product launch, resulting in $2 million in new revenue in first year.”

The second bullet point is much more specific and provides more detail about what exactly you did and the outcome of your work.

Related: What Is a Marketing Manager? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

Applicant tracking systems (ATS) are used by many companies to help them filter out unqualified candidates. When you apply for a marketing manager role, the ATS will scan your resume for certain keywords related to the job. If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right terms, the ATS might automatically reject your application.

The best way to make sure your resume makes it past the ATS is to include keywords that are commonly found in marketing manager job postings. Here are a few examples:

  • Marketing Strategy
  • Digital Marketing
  • Marketing
  • Social Media Marketing
  • Advertising
  • Strategic Planning
  • Management
  • Marketing Management
  • Project Management
  • Business Strategy
  • Sales
  • Negotiation
  • Product Marketing
  • Team Leadership
  • Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
  • Business Development
  • Business Planning
  • Leadership
  • Strategy
  • Online Marketing
  • Customer Service
  • Google Analytics
  • Online Advertising
  • Public Relations
  • Facebook
  • Product Management
  • Market Research
  • Business-to-Business (B2B)
  • Social Media
  • Microsoft Access

Showcase Your Technical Skills

Marketing managers use a variety of technology tools in their work, so it’s important to list any relevant technical skills you have. Programs like Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator are essential for creating marketing materials like flyers and brochures. Additionally, marketing managers need to be familiar with social media platforms like LinkedIn and Twitter, and email marketing platforms like MailChimp. So if you have experience with any of these programs, be sure to list them in your technical skills section.

Related: How Much Does a Marketing Manager Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re writing your resume, you’ll want to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make Your Resume Easy to Scan

There are a few things you can do to make your resume formatting more effective. First, use left-aligned text rather than centered text. Additionally, use a standard font type and size, and try to keep your bullets to 2 lines or less. You should also use all-caps and bold sparingly. Finally, include some white space on the page to make the document easier to scan.

Be Concise

There is no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to the length of your resume. However, it’s generally best to keep it concise and to the point – one or two pages should be enough. When trimming down your resume, focus on removing irrelevant information and highlighting the most relevant experience and skills.

Proofread

When proofreading your resume, be sure to catch any spelling errors, punctuation mistakes, and grammatical mistakes. It is also important to be aware of easily confused words. Spell-checking your resume is a good way to catch mistakes, but it is important to have someone else read it over as well.

Consider a Summary

Resume summaries provide a snapshot of your professional experience and what you hope to do next. They are best kept short and simple, no more than three sentences, and should include information on your transferable skills, experience, and what you hope to do in the future. When crafted well, resume summaries can provide a more complete picture of your skills and experience, and help to show how you might be a good fit for a new role.

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