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19 Jobs You Can Do With a Math Degree

Knowing what you can do with a Math degree is an important step in finding a career. Check out this list of 19 jobs you can do with a degree in Math.

A math degree may not seem like the most obvious choice for a career, but the truth is that math majors are in high demand across a wide range of industries. From finance to healthcare to tech, employers are looking for graduates with strong math skills to fill a variety of roles.

“There is a misconception that math is only for people who want to be mathematicians or engineers, but the reality is that math is a critical skill for many different types of jobs,” says Jennifer Wissink, a career coach at the University of Washington.

So if you’re considering a math degree, know that you’ll have a lot of options when it comes to your career. Read on to explore some of the jobs you can get with a math degree.

Actuary

Actuaries are professionals who use their mathematical skills to assess risk and predict the likelihood of future events. They work in a variety of industries, including insurance, finance, and healthcare. Actuaries use their skills to develop policies that minimize risk and maximize profits.

Actuaries are in high demand due to the complex nature of the modern world. They need to be able to understand and analyze large data sets, and their work is essential in industries where managing risk is crucial.

A career as an actuary is a great option for math majors. It is a challenging and rewarding field that offers good job security and high salaries. Actuaries need to have strong analytical and problem-solving skills, and they must be able to communicate their findings clearly. If you are interested in a career in actuarial science, you should consider pursuing a degree in mathematics.

Mathematician

Mathematicians use their knowledge of mathematics and statistics to solve problems in a variety of fields, such as science, engineering, business, and finance. They develop new methods and techniques to solve problems, and they also may use existing methods to solve problems in new ways. Mathematicians also work on problems that have no known solutions, such as the Riemann hypothesis.

Mathematicians typically need a master’s degree or Ph.D. in mathematics, although some jobs may only require a bachelor’s degree. Mathematicians who work in government or industry may need only a bachelor’s degree, but those who work in academia or for private research firms usually need a master’s degree or Ph.D.

Mathematicians typically work in offices, but they may also travel to attend conferences or to conduct research. Some mathematicians work on a freelance basis.

The median annual wage for mathematicians was $101,560 in May 2019. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $51,800, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $166,400.

Statistician

Statisticians collect, analyze, and interpret data to help solve problems in a variety of fields, such as business, engineering, healthcare, and the sciences. They use their mathematical skills to develop models and algorithms, design experiments, and create simulations. Statisticians also use their skills to communicate their findings to others through reports and presentations.

Statisticians need to have strong math skills, as well as analytical and problem-solving skills. They must be able to think logically and work with large amounts of data. They must also be able to communicate their findings to others in a clear and concise manner.

Statisticians typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in math, statistics, or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or PhD. Statisticians who work in the government or in industries that require certification may need to meet additional requirements.

Statisticians typically work in offices, but they may also travel to work on site with clients. They may work on a team or individually. Some statisticians work from home.

Data Analyst

Data analysts collect, process, and analyze data to help inform business decisions. They use their strong math skills to organize and interpret data, identify trends, and develop recommendations. Data analysts typically work in fields such as finance, marketing, healthcare, and government.

Data analysts need to be able to effectively communicate their findings to those who may not have a background in math or statistics. They also need to be able to work with large data sets and have strong problem-solving skills.

A career as a data analyst can be very rewarding for math majors. You get to use your math skills to help organizations make better decisions. You also get to work with large data sets and solve complex problems.

Financial Analyst

A financial analyst is responsible for providing accurate and timely financial analysis to support decision making within an organization. They produce reports and forecasts that assess an organization’s financial health, identify trends and business risks, and offer recommendations for improvement. Financial analysts typically have a strong background in mathematics and use their analytical skills to interpret data and solve problems.

This is a great career for math majors because it allows you to use your analytical and problem-solving skills to make a real impact on an organization. You’ll need to be able to effectively communicate your findings to non-financial stakeholders, so strong communication skills are also essential.

To become a financial analyst, you’ll need at least a bachelor’s degree in mathematics or a related field. Many financial analysts also have a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) or a master’s degree in finance. Some organizations may also require financial analysts to be certified, such as a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA).

Accountant

Accountants are responsible for maintaining financial records, preparing and filing taxes, and providing advice on financial matters. They use their math skills to calculate, analyze, and report on financial data. Accountants must be detail-oriented and able to work with large amounts of data. They must also be able to communicate their findings to clients and other stakeholders.

A career in accounting can be very rewarding for math majors. You get to use your math skills to help businesses and individuals make sound financial decisions. You also get to play a vital role in ensuring that taxes are paid correctly and on time. With a bachelor’s degree in accounting, you can qualify for entry-level positions in public accounting, corporate accounting, government accounting, or non-profit accounting. With experience, you can advance to senior positions, such as controller or chief financial officer.

Auditor

Auditors are responsible for examining an organization’s financial records to ensure accuracy and compliance with laws and regulations. They may also provide recommendations for improving the organization’s financial management.

Auditors use their math skills on a daily basis to analyze data, prepare reports, and make recommendations. They must be able to pay close attention to detail and have strong analytical and problem-solving skills.

Auditors typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. Some employers may prefer candidates who have a master’s degree or certified public accountant (CPA) designation.

Auditing can be a good career choice for math majors as it allows them to use their analytical and problem-solving skills on a daily basis. It is also a stable career with good job prospects.

Budget Analyst

A budget analyst is responsible for preparing and managing an organization’s budget. They work with managers and other staff to ensure that the budget is accurate and meets the needs of the organization. Budget analysts also monitor spending and may make recommendations on how to reduce costs.

Budget analysts need strong math skills to be able to do their job effectively. They must be able to understand and analyze financial data, and make recommendations based on their findings. They also need to be able to communicate their findings to managers and other staff.

Budget analyst roles are typically found in larger organizations, such as corporations, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. They may also work for accounting firms or consulting firms that provide budget analysis services to clients.

Becoming a budget analyst is a great career choice for math majors who are interested in working with numbers and financial data. It is a role that offers a lot of responsibility and can lead to management positions in larger organizations.

Economist

Economists use their math skills to study and analyze economic issues at the micro (individual businesses and consumers) and macro (national and global) levels. They develop models and conduct research to help explain economic phenomena, forecast future economic activity, and inform public policy.

Economists typically work in the government, for think tanks or research organizations, or at banks or other financial institutions. They often work on teams with other economists and professionals from related disciplines such as finance, statistics, and computer science.

A career in economics is a great option for math majors who are interested in using their skills to analyze and solve real-world problems. Economists need to be able to think critically and solve complex problems, and they must be able to communicate their findings clearly to a non-technical audience.

Market Research Analyst

A market research analyst studies market conditions to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand what products people want, who will buy them, and at what price. To do this, they use data and analytics to generate reports, create presentations, and make recommendations.

This is a great job for math majors because it relies heavily on data analysis and interpretation. You will need to be able to understand complex data sets, identify trends, and make predictions. Strong communication skills are also important as you will be presenting your findings to clients and colleagues.

A market research analyst typically needs at least a bachelor’s degree, though some employers may prefer a master’s degree. You will also need to have strong analytical and computer skills.

Operations Research Analyst

Operations research analysts use mathematical and analytical methods to help organizations solve complex problems. They develop models and simulations to identify and assess problems, and then design and implement solutions. Operations research analysts typically work in fields such as transportation, healthcare, manufacturing, and finance.

Operations research analysts need strong math skills to build and work with models and simulations. They also need to be able to communicate effectively to explain their findings and recommendations to non-technical staff and managers. If you enjoy using your math skills to solve complex problems and help organizations run more efficiently, then a career as an operations research analyst may be a good fit for you.

Business Analyst

Business analysts are responsible for bridging the gap between the business and technical sides of an organization. They gather and analyze data to help companies make better business decisions. This might involve developing financial models to forecast business outcomes, conducting market research, or designing process improvements. Business analysts need to have strong math skills to be able to effectively analyze data and develop models. They also need to be able to communicate their findings to non-technical stakeholders in a way that is easy to understand.

Business analysts typically have a bachelor’s degree in business, economics, math, or a related field. Many companies also require business analysts to have a certain amount of work experience. If you’re interested in becoming a business analyst, you can start by interning or working in a role that involves data analysis. You can also look into getting a professional certification, such as a Certified Business Analyst Professional (CBAP) designation.

Credit Analyst

A credit analyst is responsible for assessing the creditworthiness of individuals or businesses. They use their mathematical skills to analyze financial data, assess risk, and make recommendations about whether to extend credit. Credit analysts typically work in the financial services industry for banks, credit unions, or other lending institutions.

Credit analysts need to be able to think critically and solve problems. They must be able to understand and analyze complex financial data, and use their findings to make recommendations about extending credit. Because of the nature of the job, credit analysts must be able to communicate their findings clearly and concisely, both in writing and verbally.

A bachelor’s degree in mathematics is a good foundation for a career as a credit analyst. Many credit analysts also have a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) or a master’s degree in finance. Some credit analysts may also become certified public accountants (CPAs).

Financial Examiner

A financial examiner is responsible for ensuring that financial institutions are compliant with laws and regulations. They conduct audits, review financial statements, and assess risks. Financial examiners typically work for state or federal governments, banks, or accounting firms.

This is a great career for math majors because it requires strong analytical and problem-solving skills. Financial examiners need to be able to understand complex financial data and documents, and identify risks. They also need to be able to communicate their findings clearly to those who may not have a background in finance.

Loan Officer

Loan officers typically work for banks, credit unions, and other financial institutions. They evaluate loan applications and make recommendations to approve or deny the loan. To do this, they must review the applicant’s credit history, employment history, and current financial situation. They also need to calculate the applicant’s debt-to-income ratio to determine if they can afford the loan.

Loan officers need to have strong math skills to be able to calculate an applicant’s debt-to-income ratio and to determine if the loan is a good fit for the applicant. They also need to have strong people skills to be able to build relationships with applicants and explain the loan process.

If you’re interested in a career in banking or finance, becoming a loan officer is a great way to get started. Loan officer roles are typically considered entry-level jobs, though having an internship under your belt at the kind of organization you’re interested in working for (such as a bank, credit union, or other financial institution) can help.

Personal Financial Advisor

A personal financial advisor helps people make smart decisions with their money. They provide guidance on a variety of financial topics, including investing, saving for retirement, and managing debt. Financial advisors use their math skills to calculate risks and returns, create financial plans, and track progress towards goals. They also need to be able to effectively communicate with clients to explain complex concepts and provide recommendations.

Personal financial advising is a great career for math majors because it allows you to use your analytical and problem-solving skills to make a real difference in people’s lives. It can be very rewarding to help people reach their financial goals and improve their overall financial wellbeing. There is also a lot of flexibility in this career, as you can work with clients in person or remotely, and full-time or part-time.

Real Estate Appraiser

A real estate appraiser is a professional who provides an estimate of the value of a piece of property, usually in connection with the sale or purchase of that property. Appraisers use their math skills to calculate the value of the property, taking into account a variety of factors such as location, square footage, age, and recent sales of similar properties.

A career as a real estate appraiser can be a good fit for math majors because it requires strong analytical and problem-solving skills. Appraisers must be able to understand and apply complex mathematical formulas, and they must be able to communicate their findings clearly to clients. Real estate appraisers typically work for banks, lending institutions, or government agencies, but some may also work as independent contractors.

In order to become a real estate appraiser, you must complete a professional education program and pass a state-licensed exam. Many states also require appraisers to complete continuing education courses on a regular basis in order to maintain their license.

College Math Professor

College math professors typically teach lower- and upper-level undergraduate math courses, though some may also teach graduate-level courses. They develop and deliver lectures, create syllabi and assignments, grade student work, and provide feedback and support to help students succeed. College math professors also conduct research in their field and publish their findings in academic journals.

This is a great career for math majors because it allows you to share your passion for the subject with students who are eager to learn. You’ll have the opportunity to develop your own teaching methods and course materials, and to see your students grow and progress over the course of the semester or year. College math professors typically have a PhD in mathematics, and many also have postdoctoral experience.

Cryptographer

A cryptographer is a mathematician who uses mathematical algorithms to encode and decode data. This data can be in the form of a message, a document, or a computer file. Cryptographers use their mathematical skills to create and break codes that are used to protect information from being accessed by unauthorized individuals.

Cryptography is a rapidly growing field that is essential for keeping information safe in the digital age. Cryptographers use their mathematical skills to create codes that cannot be broken by anyone who does not have the key to the code. This is important for protecting information such as credit card numbers, medical records, and classified information.

Cryptography is a good career choice for math majors because it combines their mathematical skills with their interest in keeping information safe. Cryptographers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, and many jobs in cryptography require a master’s degree or higher.

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