Resume

Medical Receptionist Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Medical Receptionist resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Medical receptionists are the first point of contact for many patients. They’re tasked with answering phones, scheduling appointments, and helping patients navigate the complex healthcare system.

Because medical offices rely heavily on their receptionists to create a positive impression with patients, this job requires someone who’s friendly, knowledgeable, and highly organized. It’s also a role that requires a certain level of discretion—you might need to know when to let certain things slide and when to step in to help out a physician or nurse.

Follow these tips and resume example to write a medical receptionist resume that hiring managers will love.

Michael Garcia
Phoenix, AZ | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Compassionate and efficient medical receptionist with over five years of experience in a fast-paced healthcare setting. Skilled in handling patient inquiries, scheduling appointments, and managing insurance claims. Eager to use proven organizational skills and compassionate demeanor to support patients and staff in a busy medical office.

Education
Carl Hayden Community High School Jun '08
High School Diploma
Experience
Company A, Medical Receptionist Jan '17 – Current
  • Managed incoming calls and emails from patients, physicians, and other medical staff in a professional manner.
  • Provided clerical support for the office by creating patient files, scheduling appointments, copying documents as needed, etc.
  • Assisted with general reception duties such as greeting visitors, answering phones, filing paperwork, etc.
  • Maintained confidentiality of all information pertaining to patients and assisted doctors during examinations when necessary.
  • Performed any other job-related duties assigned by management including special projects or tasks as required.
Company B, Medical Receptionist Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Answered incoming calls and transferred them to the appropriate personnel for quicker response time
  • Scheduled appointments, verified insurance information and collected co-pays from patients before seeing their doctor
  • Maintained patient records in a HIPAA-compliant electronic medical system (EMS) database
  • Created email newsletters that included health tips, wellness articles and promotions for upcoming events
  • Managed pharmacy inventory by ordering new prescriptions when necessary
Company C, Medical Assistant Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Greeted patients and provided them with the necessary paperwork to complete their visit.
  • Assisted patients with scheduling appointments and follow-up visits.
  • Performed basic clinical tasks such as taking vitals, administering injections, and drawing blood.
Certifications
  • Certified Medical Receptionist
  • Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers (BLS)
  • Medical Terminology Certification
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Medical Terminology, CPT/ICD-10 Codes, HIPAA Compliance, Billing, Insurance Claims, Customer Service, Medical Assisting
Technical Skills: Microsoft Office Suite, Typing, KYC, Patient Scheduling, Patient History
Soft Skills: Communication, Phone Etiquette, Customer Service, Attention to Detail, Multi-Tasking, Conflict Resolution

How to Write a Medical Receptionist Resume

Here’s how to write a medical receptionist resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

The best way to make your resume stand out is to use specific, descriptive language. Rather than saying you “provided customer service,” you could say you “provided customer service by greeting patients and visitors, answering phones, and filing paperwork.”

The second bullet point is much stronger because it provides specific details about what you did and the results of your work. It also includes a quantifiable measure of success—filing paperwork—which makes it easier for a reader to understand your role in the process.

Related: What Is a Medical Receptionist? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

When you apply for a medical receptionist job, your resume will likely be scanned by an applicant tracking system (ATS) for certain keywords. This system is designed to search for specific terms related to the job opening, like “medical coding” or “patient care.” If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right terms, your application might not even make it to a recruiter.

To increase your chances of getting an interview, use this list of medical receptionist keywords as a starting point to help you identify the skills and experience that are most relevant to the role:

  • Medical Receptionist
  • Medical Records
  • Electronic Medical Record (EMR)
  • U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
  • Office Administration
  • Data Entry
  • Medical Terminology
  • Medical Billing
  • Phone Etiquette
  • Receptionist Duties
  • Healthcare
  • Scheduling
  • Appointment Scheduling
  • Administrative Assistance
  • Medical Assisting
  • Customer Service
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
  • Hospitals
  • Fax
  • Patient Safety
  • Medical Transcription
  • Epic Systems
  • Clerical Skills
  • Medical Coding
  • Health Information Management
  • Electronic Medical Record (EMR) Implementation
  • Insurance Verification
  • Health Insurance
  • Switchboard
  • Data Collection

Showcase Your Technical Skills

When applying for a medical receptionist position, it is important to list your technical skills prominently on your resume. This is because medical receptionists use a variety of technology in their work, including electronic health records (EHR) systems, patient monitoring systems, and medical devices.

Some of the programs and systems that medical receptionists are typically expected to be proficient in include: EHR software, practice management software, appointment scheduling software, and medical billing software. Additionally, medical receptionists should be familiar with common medical terms and abbreviations.

Related: How Much Does a Medical Receptionist Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re crafting your resume, it’s important to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make Your Resume Easy to Scan

There are a few things you can do to make your resume easier to read and understand quickly. Aligning everything to the left, using a standard font type and size, and keeping bullets under 2 lines will help make your resume more skimmable. You should also try to leave some white space on the page to help the recruiter easily scan through your information.

Be Concise

Ultimately, the length of your resume will come down to how much experience you have to include. A one-page resume is often sufficient for recent graduates or those early in their careers, while a two-page resume is more common for those with eight or more years of experience. However, it is important to be selective about the information you include and to tailor your resume to the specific role you are applying for.

Proofread

Proofreading your resume is important in order to make sure it looks professional and error-free. Spell checking is a must, as are punctuation and grammar checks. It is also helpful to have someone else proofread your resume for you, as they may catch mistakes that you have missed. Beware of easily confused words, and make sure that your tense is consistent throughout the resume.

Consider Including a Summary

When it comes to your resume, using a summary statement can be extremely beneficial. This section gives you an opportunity to provide context for your experience, highlight your most relevant skills, and state your intentions. By doing so, you can make it easier for potential employers to see how you might be a good fit for their organization.

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