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22 Jobs You Can Do With an Organizational Leadership Degree

Knowing what you can do with a Organizational Leadership degree is an important step in finding a career. Check out this list of 22 jobs you can do with a degree in Organizational Leadership.

Organizational leadership is a field that is all about people. If you’re interested in a career that involves working with others to achieve common goals, then a degree in organizational leadership could be a great fit for you.

“Organizational leadership is really about understanding people and groups and how they interact to achieve results,” says Jennifer Moss, a career coach at the University of San Francisco. “It’s a field that is all about relationships, communication, and collaboration.”

While some organizational leadership majors may go on to become leaders in their field, others may use their skills in a variety of different roles, from human resources to marketing to event planning. No matter what you end up doing, a degree in organizational leadership will give you the skills you need to be successful.

Human Resources Manager

Human resources managers are responsible for the recruitment, selection, and training of employees. They also work to develop and implement policies related to employee compensation and benefits, labor relations, and equal opportunity employment. In addition, human resources managers may be responsible for investigating and resolving employee complaints.

Human resources managers need to be able to effectively communicate with employees at all levels of an organization. They must also be able to develop and maintain relationships with employees, as well as with outside vendors and service providers. In addition, human resources managers need to have strong problem-solving and conflict-resolution skills.

Organizational leadership majors are well-suited for human resources manager roles, as they have the necessary skills to effectively manage and lead a team of employees. In addition, organizational leadership majors have the ability to develop and implement policies and procedures, as well as to resolve conflicts.

Training And Development Manager

A training and development manager is responsible for creating and implementing training programs that will teach employees the skills they need to be successful in their jobs. They work with managers to identify training needs, design and deliver training programs, and assess the effectiveness of the training. Training and development managers also create and maintain employee development programs, such as mentorship programs and succession planning.

This role is a good fit for organizational leadership majors because it requires strong leadership and communication skills, as well as the ability to develop and implement programs. Organizational leadership majors also learn how to assess the needs of an organization and its employees, which is essential in this role.

Compensation And Benefits Manager

A compensation and benefits manager is responsible for developing and administering employee compensation and benefits programs. They work with senior management to develop programs that are aligned with the organization’s overall business strategy, and they also work with HR staff to ensure that programs are administered fairly and consistently. In addition, compensation and benefits managers stay up-to-date on changes in laws and regulations that could impact the organization, and they also work with outside vendors to secure the best possible rates for the organization’s employees.

Compensation and benefits managers need to have strong analytical skills to be able to develop and administer programs that are cost-effective and meet the needs of the organization and its employees. They also need to be able to effectively communicate with senior management, HR staff, and employees to ensure that everyone is aware of and understands the programs. In addition, compensation and benefits managers need to be able to stay organized and handle multiple tasks simultaneously.

If you’re interested in a career in HR or management, becoming a compensation and benefits manager is a great way to get started. Compensation and benefits manager roles are typically considered mid-level jobs, and most organizations will require that you have at least a bachelor’s degree in HR, business, or a related field. In addition, some organizations may also require that you have a few years of experience working in HR or management before you can be considered for a compensation and benefits manager role.

Labor Relations Manager

A labor relations manager is responsible for maintaining and improving the relationship between an organization and its employees. They may be involved in activities such as contract negotiation, grievance resolution, benefits administration, and policy development. In some cases, labor relations managers may also be responsible for managing a team of human resources professionals.

Labor relations managers need to have excellent communication and negotiation skills in order to effectively represent their organization’s interests and to resolve conflicts. They must also be able to develop and maintain positive relationships with employees, union representatives, and other stakeholders.

Organizational leadership majors are well-suited for this role as they have the necessary skills to manage people and relationships. They also have the ability to develop and implement policies and procedures.

Organizational Development Consultant

Organizational development consultants work with businesses to improve their efficiency and effectiveness. They assess the needs of the organization and develop plans to improve performance. This may involve developing new policies and procedures, training employees, or improving communication and collaboration. Organizational development consultants must have strong problem-solving skills and be able to think creatively to develop innovative solutions. They must also be able to communicate effectively with clients and other stakeholders.

Organizational development consultants are a good fit for organizational leadership majors because they are able to use their skills and knowledge to help businesses improve. They are able to assess the needs of an organization and develop plans to improve performance. This work requires strong problem-solving skills and the ability to think creatively to develop innovative solutions. Organizational development consultants must also be able to communicate effectively with clients and other stakeholders.

Recruiting Manager

Recruiting managers are responsible for leading and coordinating the recruiting efforts for their organization. This includes developing recruiting strategies, sourcing and screening candidates, conducting interviews, and extending job offers. Recruiting managers also work closely with hiring managers to ensure that they are finding the best candidates for their open positions.

Recruiting managers need to be excellent communicators, both written and verbal, as they will be communicating with a variety of stakeholders including candidates, hiring managers, and other members of the HR team. They should also be well-organized and detail-oriented, as they will be managing a lot of information and coordinating a variety of activities. Finally, recruiting managers should have a strong understanding of the organization’s business and culture, as they will be responsible for finding candidates that are a good fit for the organization.

If you’re interested in a career in human resources, becoming a recruiting manager is a great option. Recruiting managers typically have a bachelor’s degree in human resources, business, or a related field, and many have a master’s degree as well. Having a degree in organizational leadership can give you the skills and knowledge you need to be successful in this role.

Human Resources Information Systems Manager

Human resources information systems (HRIS) managers are responsible for the technology that helps organizations manage employee data. This includes developing and maintaining systems to track employee information like payroll, benefits, time off, and performance data. HRIS managers work with other members of the HR team to ensure that the systems they develop meet the needs of the organization and its employees.

HRIS managers need to have strong analytical and problem-solving skills to be able to design and implement systems that meet the specific needs of their organizations. They also need to be able to effectively communicate with different stakeholders, including employees, managers, and IT staff.

If you’re interested in working in HR and have strong analytical and communication skills, a career as an HRIS manager may be a good fit for you. HRIS manager roles are typically considered mid-level jobs, so you will need a few years of experience working in HR or in a related field before you can be considered for this role.

Employee Assistance Program Coordinator

Employee assistance program coordinators work to develop and implement programs that support employees in times of need. This might include developing crisis intervention plans, providing counseling and referral services, and leading educational workshops on topics like stress management or conflict resolution.

Employee assistance program coordinators use their organizational skills to develop programs that meet the needs of their employees, and their leadership skills to implement these programs effectively. They also need to be able to effectively communicate with employees to understand their needs and provide them with the resources they need to thrive.

This is a great career for organizational leadership majors because it allows you to use your skills to directly support and improve the lives of employees. If you’re interested in this field, you can start by working in a human resources department or as a consultant for an employee assistance program.

Employment Interviewer

An employment interviewer is responsible for conducting interviews with job applicants to determine their qualifications for a particular position. This role requires strong interpersonal skills, as the interviewer must be able to build rapport with applicants and ask probing questions to elicit relevant information. They must also be able to assess applicants objectively and make recommendations to hiring managers based on their findings.

Organizational leadership majors are well-suited for this role as they have the necessary skills to build relationships, ask questions, and assess people. This role also requires excellent communication skills, as the interviewer must be able to provide feedback to applicants in a clear and concise manner.

Equal Opportunity Specialist

Equal opportunity specialists work to ensure that everyone in an organization has an equal chance to succeed. They develop policies and programs to promote diversity and prevent discrimination, and they work with managers and employees to ensure that everyone is treated fairly. They also investigate complaints of discrimination and take appropriate action.

Equal opportunity specialists need strong interpersonal and communication skills to be effective in their jobs. They must be able to work with people from a variety of backgrounds and build relationships of trust. They also need to be able to handle difficult situations and conflict resolution.

If you’re interested in promoting diversity and ensuring that everyone has an equal chance to succeed, then a career as an equal opportunity specialist may be a good fit for you. Equal opportunity specialists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree, and some organizations may prefer candidates with a master’s degree.

Placement Specialist

Placement specialists work with individuals and organizations to identify and secure employment opportunities that are the best match for the individual’s skills and interests. They may provide resume writing and interviewing assistance, job search strategies, and referrals to job openings and training programs. Placement specialists typically work in career centers, social service agencies, or government offices.

Organizational leadership majors are well suited for placement specialist roles as they have the skills and knowledge to assist individuals in achieving their career goals. They are able to assess an individual’s skills and interests, and match them with appropriate employment opportunities. They also have the ability to build relationships with employers and understand their needs. Placement specialists need to be able to effectively communicate with individuals and groups, and have strong writing skills.

Salary Administrator

A salary administrator is responsible for ensuring that employees are paid fairly and in a timely manner. They work with payroll, benefits, and HR departments to ensure that employees are being paid correctly and that all deductions are being taken out correctly. They also work with managers to ensure that employees are being paid according to their position and experience level.

A salary administrator needs to have strong organizational skills in order to keep track of all the different employee salaries and deductions. They also need to be able to effectively communicate with managers and employees in order to resolve any issues that may arise.

This is a great career for organizational leadership majors because it allows them to use their skills in organizing and communicating to help ensure that employees are being treated fairly. It is also a great way to learn about the different aspects of HR and payroll.

Job Analyst

A job analyst is responsible for conducting in-depth analyses of specific jobs within an organization. This can involve studying the duties and tasks associated with a job, the skills and knowledge required, and the work environment. Job analysts use this information to develop job descriptions, which are used in the hiring process.

Organizational leadership majors are well-suited for this role as they have the skills and knowledge necessary to understand the complexities of different jobs within an organization. They are also able to effectively communicate this information to others. In addition, job analysts need to be able to work independently and be detail-oriented, two qualities that are often developed through leadership roles.

If you’re interested in becoming a job analyst, you will need at least a bachelor’s degree in organizational leadership or a related field. Many job analysts also have a master’s degree or higher. In addition, some organizations may require job analysts to have certification from a professional organization, such as the Society for Human Resource Management.

Workforce Planning Analyst

A workforce planning analyst is responsible for analyzing an organization’s workforce and making recommendations on how to optimize staffing levels. This may involve analyzing data on employee turnover, skills gaps, and future growth plans. Workforce planning analysts use their findings to develop plans for recruiting, training, and retaining employees.

This role is a good fit for organizational leadership majors because it requires strong analytical and problem-solving skills. You must be able to understand complex data sets and make recommendations based on your findings. You must also be able to effectively communicate your recommendations to decision-makers. Strong project management skills are also important in this role, as you will likely be responsible for leading and coordinating workforce planning initiatives.

Talent Acquisition Specialist

A talent acquisition specialist is responsible for identifying, attracting, and hiring top talent for an organization. They develop and implement recruiting strategies, post job openings, screen and interview candidates, and extend job offers. In order to be successful in this role, talent acquisition specialists must have excellent communication and interpersonal skills, be able to think strategically, and have a strong understanding of the organization’s culture and values.

This role is a great fit for organizational leadership majors because it allows them to use their skills in communication, interpersonal relations, and strategic thinking to attract and hire the best talent for their organization. Additionally, they will gain valuable experience in screening and interviewing candidates, as well as extending job offers.

Leadership Development Facilitator

A leadership development facilitator helps individuals and groups to grow and develop their leadership skills. This may involve facilitating workshops and training sessions, developing and delivering presentations, conducting one-on-one coaching, and providing feedback and support.

Leadership development facilitators need to be excellent communicators, both in terms of written and verbal communication. They also need to be able to build relationships easily, as they will be working with a variety of different people. Additionally, they need to be able to think creatively in order to develop new and innovative ways to help people develop their leadership skills.

This is a great career for organizational leadership majors because it allows them to use their skills and knowledge to help others grow and develop. Additionally, it provides an opportunity to work with a variety of different people, which can be both challenging and rewarding.

Executive Coach

An executive coach is a professional who helps leaders and managers improve their performance in the workplace. As an executive coach, you will work with clients one-on-one or in small groups to help them identify areas of improvement, set goals, and create action plans. You will also provide feedback, support, and accountability as your clients work to reach their goals.

Organizational leadership majors are well-suited for careers as executive coaches because they have the necessary skills and knowledge to help leaders and managers improve their performance. They understand how to assess individual and organizational needs, develop goals and action plans, and provide support and accountability. In addition, they have the ability to build relationships and communicate effectively, which are essential skills for executive coaches.

Change Management Consultant

Change management consultants help organizations transition from one state to another, whether that’s implementing a new strategy, adopting new technology, or undergoing a merger or acquisition. They develop and execute plans to manage the people side of change, which can include communications, training, and organizational design.

Change management consultants need to be excellent communicators, problem-solvers, and project managers. They also need to have a deep understanding of how people behave and interact within organizations. As an organizational leadership major, you have the perfect skillset for a career in change management. You’re familiar with the challenges and opportunities that come with leading people through change, and you have the ability to develop and implement plans that will help an organization successfully transition to its new state.

Organization Effectiveness Consultant

Organization effectiveness consultants help organizations improve their performance by assessing their current state, identifying areas of improvement, and developing and implementing plans for change. They work with organizations of all sizes in a variety of industries, and no two projects are alike.

This role is a good fit for organizational leadership majors because it allows you to use your skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and project management to help organizations achieve their goals. You’ll also get to work with a variety of people, including senior leaders, and learn about different industries and organizations.

To be successful in this role, you should have a strong understanding of organizational behavior and dynamics, as well as experience in assessment and change management. If you’re interested in this career, you should consider pursuing a master’s degree in organizational psychology or a related field.

Strategic Human Resources Consultant

A strategic human resources consultant provides analysis and recommendations to organizations on how to improve their HR practices. This may include conducting audits, analyzing data, developing policies, and designing and implementing programs. In addition to being knowledgeable about HR best practices, a successful consultant must also be able to effectively communicate their findings and recommendations to clients.

This is a great career for organizational leadership majors because it allows you to use your skills in problem solving, analysis, and communication to help organizations improve their most important asset—their people. You’ll also get to learn about a variety of businesses and industries and see how they operate from an HR perspective.

Human Capital Consultant

Human capital consultants work with organizations to improve their employee productivity and effectiveness. They assess an organization’s current workforce, identify areas where improvements can be made, and develop and implement strategies to help the organization reach its goals. This might involve developing training programs, designing compensation plans, or improving communication and collaboration between employees.

Human capital consultants need to be excellent communicators, as they need to be able to understand an organization’s needs and explain their recommendations in a way that is clear and actionable. They also need to be able to work well with people, as they will be working with a variety of stakeholders within an organization. Organizational leadership majors are well-suited for this career, as they have the necessary skills and knowledge to be successful.

Human Resources Business Partner

Human resources business partners (HRBPs) are HR professionals who align their work with the business goals of their organization. In this role, you’ll consult with managers and employees on a variety of topics, such as talent management, performance management, employee relations, and organizational development. You’ll also work to create and implement HR initiatives that support the business’s goals.

HRBPs need to have strong communication and interpersonal skills to be successful in this role. They also need to be able to think strategically and be familiar with business concepts. As an organizational leadership major, you have the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in this role.

If you’re interested in working in HR, becoming an HRBP is a great way to get started. HRBP roles are typically considered entry-level jobs, though having an internship under your belt at the kind of organization you’re interested in working for can help.

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