Resume

Product Designer Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Product Designer resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

If you have a knack for solving complex problems and you enjoy thinking outside of the box, you might be a great fit for the role of a product designer. Product designers are responsible for creating the look, feel, and functionality of a company’s products. They work closely with other members of their team to determine what new products should look like or how existing ones should be improved upon.

Product designers need a wide range of skills to succeed in their roles—the ability to collaborate with teams, create compelling visual concepts, and identify pain points in existing products are just some of the things they do on a regular basis. They also need to have a solid grasp on the market they’re designing for, as well as the broader industry landscape.

Here are some tips and an example to help you write a fantastic product designer resume that will get you noticed by hiring managers.

Jennifer Thomas
Chicago, IL | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Creative product designer with experience in both consumer-facing and enterprise products. Passionate about creating beautiful, intuitive, and user-friendly designs that solve real-world problems. Skilled in Sketch, Adobe Photoshop, and Illustrator.

Education
Illinois Institute of Technology Jun '10
B.S. in Industrial Design
Experience
Company A, Product Designer Jan '17 – Current
  • Led the design of a new product that helps companies manage their employee benefits and health care, resulting in over $1M/month in revenue within 6 months.
  • Collaborated with engineers to create wireframes for features such as an automated enrollment process and user-friendly dashboard.
  • Created visual designs for web pages, mobile apps, emails, marketing materials, etc., including color palettes, typography choices, layout structures, etc.
  • Conducted usability tests on prototypes with customers to gather feedback and iterate based on customer needs and pain points.
  • Managed project timelines from start to finish by setting milestones with team members and adhering to deadlines set by other teams (engineering).
Company B, Product Designer Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Collaborated with developers, marketing and sales teams to create prototypes of new products
  • Created wireframes for each product using Axure RP software before creating mockups in Photoshop
  • Designed a mobile app that was downloaded over 100,000 times within the first month of release
  • Improved user experience by conducting surveys on competitors’ products and analyzing data from customer support calls
  • Reduced development time by 80% through improved collaboration between design and engineering teams
Company C, Graphic Designer Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Created graphic design solutions for a variety of clients, including small businesses, non-profit organizations, and individuals.
  • Utilized a variety of software programs to create designs, including Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign.
  • Worked with clients to understand their needs and develop designs that met their objectives.
Certifications
  • Certified Product Designer
  • Certified ScrumMaster
  • Lean Six Sigma Black Belt
Skills

Industry Knowledge: UX, UI Design, Wireframing, Prototyping, Branding, Marketing
Technical Skills: Sketch 3, Invision, Invision Studio, Adobe XD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign
Soft Skills: Communication, Leadership, Teamwork, Time Management, Creativity, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving

How to Write a Product Designer Resume

Here’s how to write a product designer resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

When it comes to your resume, it’s important to be as specific as possible when describing your past experience. Rather than saying you “designed websites,” you could say that you “designed mobile-friendly website templates for small businesses in the hospitality industry, resulting in a 20% increase in click-through rates on Google search results page.”

The second bullet point is much stronger because it provides specific details about what you did, how you did it, and the results of your work.

Related: What Is a Product Designer? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

When you apply for a job as a product designer, your resume is usually entered into an applicant tracking system (ATS). This system looks for certain keywords related to the job opening in order to determine whether your skills and experience are a match for the position. If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right keywords, the ATS might discard your application.

To increase your chances of getting an interview, use this list of keywords to help you identify the skills and experience that are most relevant to the product designer role:

  • Product Design
  • Adobe Illustrator
  • User Experience Design (UED)
  • Adobe Photoshop
  • Sketch App
  • Product Design & Development
  • Interaction Design
  • User Interface Design
  • User Experience (UX)
  • Mobile Design
  • Wireframing
  • Adobe Creative Suite
  • Mobile Apps
  • Usability
  • Adobe InDesign
  • Product Management
  • Design Thinking
  • User Research
  • Axure RP
  • Industrial Design
  • AutoCAD
  • User-centered Design
  • Design
  • Sketching
  • Design Strategy
  • Visual Design
  • InVision
  • Design Principles
  • Adobe XD
  • HCI

Showcase Your Technical Skills

As a product designer, you are responsible for developing the look and feel of a product. This includes creating sketches, prototypes, and final designs. In order to be successful in this role, it is essential that you are proficient in the use of design software programs, like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Additionally, product designers should be familiar with 3D rendering software programs, like Autodesk Maya and 3ds Max, and CAD software programs, like SolidWorks and AutoCAD.

If you have experience with any of these programs, be sure to list them in your technical skills section. Additionally, if you have any design-related certifications, like the Adobe Certified Associate (ACA) or Autodesk Certified User (ACU), be sure to list them as well.

Related: How Much Does a Product Designer Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re writing your resume, you’ll want to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make Sure Your Resume Is Easy to Scan

There are a few things you can do to make your resume more readable and easier to scan. First, use left-aligned text, a standard font type and size, and bullets instead of paragraphs to list your experiences. You should also try to keep your bullets to 2 lines or less, and use digits for numbers. Finally, include some white space on the page to help the document look less overwhelming.

Be Concise

When writing a resume, you want to be concise and get your point across quickly. This means that a one-page resume is ideal, unless you have a lot of experience to include. If you do need to go over one page, make sure to focus on the most relevant and recent experience. In general, you want to be succinct and get to the point.

Proofread

Proofreading your resume is an important step in ensuring that it looks its best. There are a few key things to watch for: spelling mistakes, punctuation mistakes, and grammatical mistakes. You should also be aware of easily confused words, such as their/there/they’re and to/too/two. Spell checking your resume is a good start, but you should also have someone else proofread it for you to catch any mistakes that you may have missed.

Consider a Summary

When writing a resume, it’s important to use every tool at your disposal to make yourself stand out from the competition. A resume summary statement is one way to do that, as it allows you to succinctly highlight your skills and experiences and explain how they’ll benefit a potential employer. Additionally, a well-written summary can help to show a recruiter that you have a clear idea of what you want to do and where you want to go with your career. If you’re unsure of how to write a summary, or you need help translating your experience into terms a recruiter will understand, there are plenty of resources available to help. With a little effort, you can create a summary that will make you stand out from the crowd.

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