Resume

Research Director Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Research Director resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Research is an important part of any company’s success—and it can be a critical component in advancing your own career. Research is all about gathering data, analyzing information, and drawing conclusions based on what you find.

Research roles can be found in almost every industry. Some research analysts work in academia, conducting studies to test hypotheses or analyze existing data sets. Others work for private companies, helping their clients make strategic decisions about everything from new product development to marketing campaigns. And still others work for government agencies, conducting research that impacts everything from environmental regulations to social programs.

In any research role, you’ll be expected to think critically, interpret data effectively, identify trends, and make recommendations based on your findings. Here are some tips and an example resume template to help you write a research analyst resume that will get you noticed.

David Moore
Chicago, IL | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Seasoned research director with more than 10 years of experience in market research and consulting. Proven ability to develop and manage research projects from start to finish, utilizing both primary and secondary data sources. Specializes in the technology, telecommunications, and automotive industries.

Education
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Jun '10
Ph.D. in Psychology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Jun '04
B.A. in Psychology
Experience
Company A, Research Director Jan '17 – Current
  • Led the research team to develop a new product that helps companies understand how their employees use email and other collaboration tools, resulting in $1M+ in annual recurring revenue for the company.
  • Conducted primary market research with over 100 customers across industries including healthcare, finance, technology, and media & entertainment to identify pain points related to employee productivity and engagement.
  • Managed project scope from inception through execution by developing detailed requirements documentation and conducting regular status meetings with stakeholders.
  • Oversaw all aspects of data collection including vendor management, survey design, deployment, analysis, reporting, etc., ensuring high-quality deliverables on time and within budget.
  • Developed marketing materials such as whitepapers and case studies to promote products/services to prospective clients which resulted in increased awareness among potential customers leading to more sales opportunities.
Company B, Research Director Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Led the development of a new research methodology that improved client satisfaction by 10%
  • Conducted market analysis and competitor intelligence to identify opportunities for innovation in products and services
  • Managed all aspects of research projects, including budgeting, recruiting participants, data collection and analysis
  • Collaborated with senior management on strategic planning initiatives based on research findings
  • Spearheaded an initiative to improve customer service through better understanding of consumer needs and expectations
Company C, Research Assistant Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Conducted library research to support the work of attorneys and clients.
  • Analyzed and summarized depositions, trial transcripts, and other legal documents.
  • Drafted correspondence and legal documents such as pleadings, briefs, and discovery requests.
Certifications
  • Certified Research Administrator
  • Certified Clinical Research Coordinator
  • Clinical Research Ethics Certification
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Research Methodology, Research Design, Data Mining, Data Analysis, Data Presentation, Data Visualization, Survey Research, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research
Technical Skills: SPSS, SAS, R, Python, Microsoft Office Suite
Soft Skills: Leadership, Team Building, Public Speaking, Communication, Presentation Skills, Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving, Decision Making

How to Write a Research Director Resume

Here’s how to write a research director resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

When it comes to writing bullet points, the more specific you can be, the better. Rather than simply saying you “conducted research,” you could say that you “conducted quantitative research on customer satisfaction levels for new product line.”

The second bullet point is much more specific and provides more detail about what exactly you did and the outcome of your work. And that level of detail will make it much easier for a recruiter or hiring manager to understand your experience and decide if it’s a good match for the job they’re trying to fill.

Related: What Is a Research Director? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

When you apply for a research director role, your resume is likely to be scanned by an applicant tracking system (ATS) for certain keywords. This software looks for specific terms related to the job, like “market research” or “data analysis,” in order to determine whether your skills and experience are a match for the job opening. If your resume doesn’t include enough relevant keywords, the ATS might discard your application.

To increase your chances of getting an interview, use this list of common research director keywords as a starting point to help you optimize your resume:

  • Research
  • Clinical Trials
  • Clinical Research
  • Statistics
  • Biostatistics
  • Medical Writing
  • Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  • Healthcare
  • CRO Management
  • Clinical Development
  • Oncology
  • Medicine
  • Life Sciences
  • Data Analysis
  • Public Health
  • Cell Culture
  • Molecular Biology
  • Electronic Data Capture (EDC)
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Analytical Method Development
  • Chemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)
  • High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)
  • Laboratory Skills
  • Cell Culture Techniques
  • Protein Purification
  • Western Blotting
  • Protein Expression
  • Biotechnology

Showcase Your Technical Skills

As a research director, you rely on technology to help you efficiently manage your research projects. Programs like Microsoft Project, Asana, Jira, SharePoint, and Trello are essential for project managers, as they allow them to keep track of tasks, deadlines, and progress. Additionally, research directors need to be familiar with research-specific software programs, like SPSS, Stata, and R.

So if you have experience with any of these programs or platforms, be sure to list them on your resume. And if you’re not familiar with them, now is the time to learn them!

Related: How Much Does a Research Director Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re crafting your resume, it’s important to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make Sure Your Resume Is Easy to Scan

Formatting your resume for readability is important for getting the most out of the limited time a recruiter spends looking at it. You should left-align all your text, use the same font size throughout, and only bold certain words or phrases for emphasis. Additionally, try to keep your bullets under 2 lines and use digits for numbers. Finally, leave some white space on the page to make the document less overwhelming.

Be Concise

There is no specific length for a resume, but most employers prefer a resume that is one page long. However, if you have a lot of experience, you may need to use two pages. When trimming down your resume, focus on the most relevant information and make sure to tailor the resume to the specific job you are applying for. Use concise, easy-to-read language and avoid including unnecessary details.

Proofread

Proofreading your resume is important in order to make sure it looks professional and error-free. Spell checking is a must, as are punctuation and grammar checks. It is also helpful to have someone else proofread your resume for you, as they may catch mistakes that you have missed. Beware of easily confused words, and make sure that your tense is consistent throughout the resume.

Use a Summary

The resume summary statement can be an extremely effective way to introduce yourself and your qualifications to a potential employer. By highlighting your best traits and skills, as well as explaining what you’re looking to do next, you can make a great first impression and show that you’re a perfect fit for the role you’re applying for. A well-crafted summary can make all the difference in getting your resume noticed.

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