Career Development

The Best States for Working from Home

  Over the past year, more workers began telecommuting due to the COVID-19 pandemic. And many of those workers may continue to work from home after the pandemic is over. Prior to the pandemic, only 20% of all employed people whose jobs could be done from home worked from home all or most of the time. That … Continued

 

Over the past year, more workers began telecommuting due to the COVID-19 pandemic. And many of those workers may continue to work from home after the pandemic is over. Prior to the pandemic, only 20% of all employed people whose jobs could be done from home worked from home all or most of the time. That number has risen to 71%, with 54% saying they want to continue working from home after the pandemic ends. In order to work at home, one not only needs a supportive employer, but a comfortable home work environment and reliable, affordable infrastructure. A recent study by WalletHub revealed the best and worst states for working from home. Read on for the list of best (and worst) states for telecommuters.

The 10 Best States for Working from Home

The following states received the highest overall scores in the WalletHub study.

1. Delaware

Total Score: 65.51

Work Environment Rank*: 4

Living Environment Rank**: 22

2. North Carolina

Total Score: 63.91

Work Environment Rank*: 8

Living Environment Rank**: 12

3. Georgia

Total Score: 63.11

Work Environment Rank*: 20

Living Environment Rank**: 1

4. New Hampshire

Total Score: 62.98

Work Environment Rank*: 7

Living Environment Rank**: 44

5. Tennessee

Total Score: 62.69

Work Environment Rank*: 12

Living Environment Rank**: 3

6. Arizona

Total Score: 62.65

Work Environment Rank*: 6

Living Environment Rank**: 24

7. New Jersey

Total Score: 62.57

Work Environment Rank*: 21

Living Environment Rank**: 17

8. Texas

Total Score: 62.11

Work Environment Rank*: 17

Living Environment Rank**: 2

9. Utah

Total Score: 62.09

Work Environment Rank*: 2

Living Environment Rank**: 29

10. Oregon

Total Score: 60.98

Work Environment Rank*: 10

Living Environment Rank**: 30

The 10 Worst States for Working from Home

The following states received the lowest overall scores in the WalletHub study

42. West Virginia

Total Score: 53.60

Work Environment Rank*: 37

Living Environment Rank**: 34

43. Iowa

Total Score: 53.49

Work Environment Rank*: 38

Living Environment Rank**: 46

44. New Mexico

Total Score: 52.74

Work Environment Rank*: 41

Living Environment Rank**: 38

45. Wyoming

Total Score: 52.71

Work Environment Rank*: 40

Living Environment Rank**: 37

46. Montana

Total Score: 51.76

Work Environment Rank*: 46

Living Environment Rank**: 25

47. Arkansas

Total Score: 50.41

Work Environment Rank*: 47

Living Environment Rank**: 18

48. Mississippi

Total Score: 50.00

Work Environment Rank*: 48

Living Environment Rank**: 7

49. North Dakota

Total Score: 49.61

Work Environment Rank*: 51

Living Environment Rank**: 14

50. Hawaii

Total Score: 45.70

Work Environment Rank*: 45

Living Environment Rank**: 51

51. Alaska

Total Score: 37.73

Work Environment Rank*: 50

Living Environment Rank**: 49

Key Stats

  • Colorado has the highest share of the labor force working from home, 8.30 percent, which is 3.5 times higher than in Mississippi, the state with the lowest at 2.40 percent.
     
  • New Hampshire has the highest share of households with a broadband internet subscription, 79.30 percent, which is 1.7 times higher than in Mississippi, the state with the lowest at 47.60 percent.
     
  • Connecticut has the highest share of households with access to broadband speeds over 25 Mbps, 98.70 percent, which is 1.5 times higher than in Mississippi, the state with the lowest at 65.40 percent.
     
  • South Dakota has the fewest cybercrime victims per 100,000 residents, 54.33, which is four times fewer than in Nevada, the state with the most at 214.68.
     
  • Indiana has the lowest amount lost per victim as a result of internet crime, $2,466, which is 11.5 times lower than in Ohio, the state with the highest at $28,394.
     
  • Oklahoma has the lowest residential retail price of electricity, 8.88 cents per kWh, which is 3.3 times lower than in Hawaii, the state with the highest at 29.14 cents per kWh. 

* Work Environment – 60 points

  • Share of Workers Working from Home (pre-COVID-19): Triple Weight (~25.71 Points)
  • Share of Potential Telecommuters: Double Weight (~17.14 Points)
    Note: Potential telecommuters are considered to be those in occupations classified as conducive to telecommuting: executive, administrative, managerial; professional specialty; technicians and related; sales; and administrative support.
  • Households’ Internet Access: Full Weight (~8.57 Points)
    Note: This composite metric measures both the share of households with a broadband subscription and the share of households with access to broadband speeds greater than 25 Mbps.
  • Cybersecurity: Full Weight (~8.57 Points)
    Note: This composite metric measures the number of internet crime victims per capita, the average amount lost as a result of internet crime and the cybersecurity risk index.

** Living Environment – 40 Points

  • Average Retail Price of Electricity: Full Weight (~5.00 Points)
  • Access to Low-priced Internet Plan: Full Weight (~5.00 Points)
    Note: This metrics refers to low-priced broadband plans and it is a composite metric that includes:
    • Cable
    • DSL
    • Fiber
  • Internet Cost: Full Weight (~5.00 Points)
    Note: This metrics refers to the price per MBPS and it is a composite metric that includes:
    • Cable
    • DSL
    • Fiber
  • Median Square Footage per Average Number of Persons in a Household: Double Weight (~10.00 Points)
  • Share of Detached Housing Units: Full Weight (~5.00 Points)
  • Average Home Square Footage: Full Weight (~5.00 Points)
  • Share of for Sale Homes with Lot Greater than 1,000 Square Feet: Half Weight (~2.50 Points)
  • Share of for Sale Homes with Swimming Pool: Half Weight (~2.50 Points)

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