Resume

Tutor Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Tutor resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

A tutor is someone who provides individualized instruction to help students learn new concepts or improve their performance. Tutors work with students one-on-one or in small groups, helping them develop the skills they need to succeed. They can work with students in almost any subject area, from math to music to sports.

If you love working with people and have a passion for education, a career as a tutor could be a great fit for you. But before you start looking for your next job, you need a resume that will land you interviews with hiring managers who are looking for someone just like you. Here are some tips to follow plus an example to look at when writing your own tutor resume.

James Smith
New York City, NY | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Experienced tutor with a passion for teaching and helping students reach their full potential. Dedicated to creating a supportive and positive learning environment that facilitates growth and builds confidence. Skilled in tutoring a variety of subjects, including math, science, and English.

Education
Columbia University Jun '10
B.A. in English
Experience
Company A, Tutor Jan '17 – Current
  • Taught students in the areas of Algebra, Geometry, and SAT/ACT prep
  • Assisted with homework assignments and projects as needed
  • Provided feedback on student progress to parents and teachers
  • Worked one-on-one or in small groups with students based on their needs
  • Maintained a professional attitude at all times during tutoring sessions
Company B, Tutor Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Created a personalized learning plan for each student based on their individual needs and goals, resulting in an average increase of 2 points per subject
  • Developed creative study techniques to help students learn difficult concepts more easily; this resulted in improved grades across the board
  • Prepared special lesson plans for struggling students that focused on building confidence and improving test-taking skills
  • Helped international students improve their English language skills by focusing on conversational speaking practice
  • Collaborated with parents to create customized tutoring schedules that fit into busy work and school schedules
Company C, Teacher’s Assistant Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Assisted teachers in their classrooms and provided assistance to students, as well as assisted with classroom management.
  • Organized learning activities for students based on the curriculum standards of NYS Education Department.
  • Provided feedback on lesson plans for future reference and assisted faculty with daily tasks such as copying, distributing homework assignments etc..
Certifications
  • New York State Teaching License
  • Bachelor of Science in Education
  • Master of Science in Education
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Biology, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Statistics
Technical Skills: Microsoft Office Suite, Google Drive, Dropbox, Blackboard
Soft Skills: Communication, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Teamwork, Leadership, Patience, Attention to Detail

How to Write a Tutor Resume

Here’s how to write a tutor resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

Bullet points are the most important part of your resume because they’re the first thing recruiters and hiring managers will see. And they’re the best way to showcase your experience and qualifications.

But many candidates make the mistake of using generic bullet points that don’t really tell a story or provide any context about their experience.

Instead, you should use your bullet points to tell a story about your experience. And that story should be specific and detailed.

For example, rather than saying you “taught students math,” you could say you “taught students at-risk for failing state exams how to pass their math exams by using innovative techniques and providing individualized attention.”

The second bullet point provides much more detail about what you did and the results of your work. And it also provides a specific number (state exam passing rate) to demonstrate your impact.

Related: What Is a Tutor? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

When you apply for a tutoring job, your resume is likely to go through an applicant tracking system (ATS). This program will scan your resume for specific keywords related to the job opening. If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right terms, the ATS might not rank it highly enough for a recruiter to see.

One way to make sure your resume makes it past the ATS is to include relevant keywords throughout all parts of your application. Here are some common tutor keywords to get you started:

  • Teaching
  • Teamwork
  • Time Management
  • Communication
  • Organization Skills
  • Research
  • Microsoft Access
  • Public Speaking
  • Customer Service
  • Cooperation
  • Social Media
  • Adobe Photoshop
  • Leadership
  • Critical Thinking
  • Higher Education
  • Curriculum Development
  • Differentiated Instruction
  • Peer Tutoring
  • Language Teaching
  • Creative Writing
  • Classroom Management
  • Mathematics
  • Education
  • Education Administration
  • Classroom Instruction
  • Lesson Planning
  • Differentiated Instruction Strategies
  • Elementary Education
  • Special Education
  • Literacy

Related: How Much Does a Tutor Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re writing your resume, you’ll want to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make It Easy to Scan

There are a few things you can do to your resume to make it easier to read and understand quickly. Aligning everything to the left, using a standard font type and size, and keeping bullets under 2 lines will help make your resume more skimmable. You should also try to leave some white space on the page to help the recruiter easily scan through your information.

Be Concise

There is no set standard for how long a resume should be. However, it is important to keep in mind that employers typically only have a limited amount of time to review your resume, so try to keep it concise and to the point. A one-page resume is generally the best option, but if you have a lot of experience to highlight, you can make a two-page resume instead. When trimming down your resume, try to remove any irrelevant information and focus on highlighting your most relevant skills and experiences.

Proofread

Proofreading your resume is important in order to make sure it looks professional and error-free. Spell checking is a must, as are punctuation and grammar checks. It is also helpful to have someone else proofread your resume for you, as they may catch mistakes that you have missed. Beware of easily confused words, and make sure that your tense is consistent throughout the resume.

Consider Including a Summary

Most job seekers are underutilizing the resume summary statement, which can be a great way to highlight your most relevant experiences and skills. A well-written summary can also serve to explain how your past experience translates into the role you’re hoping to land. When creating your summary, be sure to focus on your relevant soft skills, play up your most highly transferable experiences, and state your intentions clearly. Keep it short and sweet, and make sure it’s relevant to the role you’re applying for.

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