Resume

Welder Resume Example & Writing Guide

Use this Welder resume example and guide to improve your career and write a powerful resume that will separate you from the competition.

Welding is a highly skilled job that requires a lot of training and experience to do well. Welders are often tasked with joining pieces of metal together to create structures like bridges, cars, skyscrapers, and more.

If you’re ready to start a new job as a welder or you’re looking for a change from your current role as a welder, here are some tips and an example resume template to help you write a compelling resume that will get you noticed by recruiters.

David Moore
Chicago, IL | (123) 456-7891 | [email protected]
Summary

Skilled welder with 10 years of experience in manufacturing and construction. Proven ability to read and interpret blueprints, follow safety protocols, and work with a team to complete projects on time and within budget.

Education
Carl Sandburg High School Jun '08
High School Diploma
Experience
Company A, Welder Jan '17 – Current
  • Operated a manual or robotic welder to weld parts together and ensured quality control of the finished product.
  • Used technical drawings, schematics, and specifications to determine welding procedures for specific products.
  • Inspected completed workpieces for defects such as cracks, porosity, etc., using visual inspection techniques and tools like radiography and ultrasonic testing equipment.
  • Communicated with other departments regarding any issues that may arise during production and resolved problems in a timely manner.
  • Followed all safety regulations while on the job site including wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when necessary and adhered to company policies regarding waste disposal/recycling practices.
Company B, Welder Jan '12 – Dec '16
  • Worked with a team of five other welder to complete large-scale projects, including building bridges and skyscrapers
  • Maintained an inventory of over 100 different types of metal for use in welding projects
  • Followed all safety procedures while working on the job site; never caused any accidents or injuries
  • Completed 40+ hours of training at local vocational school to become certified welder
  • Achieved certification as AWS D1.1 Structural Welder through American Welding Society (AWS) testing process
Company C, Fabricator Jan '09 – Dec '11
  • Operated CNC machines to cut, shape, and finish metal parts and components.
  • Assembled metal parts and components using hand tools, power tools, and welding equipment.
  • Followed blueprints, engineering drawings, and other specifications to produce metal parts and components that meet customer requirements.
Certifications
  • Certified Welder
  • American Welding Society Certified Welder
Skills

Industry Knowledge: Welding, Cutting, Oxygen, Arc, Plasma, MIG, TIG
Technical Skills: Miller Spectrum 375, Miller Syncrowave 350
Soft Skills: Communication, Teamwork, Problem Solving, Initiative, Leadership

How to Write a Welder Resume

Here’s how to write a welder resume of your own.

Write Compelling Bullet Points

Bullet points are the most effective way to showcase your experience and qualifications. But rather than simply listing your responsibilities, you can make your resume more interesting by using bullet points to describe the results of your work.

For example, rather than saying you “installed metal brackets,” you could say you “installed metal brackets to support new equipment, resulting in reduced structural damage during installation.”

The second bullet point is more specific and provides more detail about what exactly you did and the outcome of your work.

Related: What Is a Welder? How to Become One

Identify and Include Relevant Keywords

Applicant tracking systems (ATS) are used by many companies to help manage the influx of resumes they receive for open positions. When you submit your resume online, the ATS will scan it for certain keywords related to the job opening. If your resume doesn’t include enough of the right terms, the ATS might automatically reject your application.

One way to make sure your resume makes it past the ATS is to include relevant keywords throughout all sections of your document. Here are some common welder keywords to get you started:

  • Welding
  • Metal Fabrication
  • Automotive
  • TIG Welding
  • MIG Welding
  • Aluminum
  • Metalwork
  • Hydraulic Cylinder
  • Flux
  • AutoCAD
  • CNC Programming
  • Maintenance & Repair
  • Repairs
  • Manufacturing
  • PTC Creo
  • CATIA
  • AutoCAD 3D
  • Spot Welding
  • Sheet Metal
  • Project Planning
  • Continuous Welding
  • AWS Standards
  • 5S
  • Lean Manufacturing
  • Customer Service
  • SAP Products
  • Microsoft Access
  • Team Leadership
  • Materials
  • Strategic Planning

Related: How Much Does a Welder Make?

Remember The Basics

As you’re writing your resume, you’ll want to keep a few basic guidelines in mind.

Make Your Resume Easy to Scan

There are a few things you can do to make your resume easier to read and understand quickly. Aligning everything to the left, using a standard font type and size, and keeping bullets under 2 lines will help make your resume more skimmable. You should also try to leave some white space on the page to help the recruiter easily scan through your information.

Be Concise

There is no set length for a resume, but a one-page resume is typically preferred. New graduates and those with less than five to eight years of professional experience should stick to one page, while those with more experience can go up to two pages. When trimming down a resume, remove irrelevant information and focus on highlighting your most relevant experience and skills.

Check Your Work

Always proofread your resume before submitting it to potential employers. Spellcheck is a good starting point, but it is not foolproof. Have a friend or family member proofread it for you to catch any mistakes you may have missed. Beware of easily confused words, such as their, there, and they’re. be consistent in your use of tenses and punctuation.

Consider Including a Summary

If you’re like most job seekers, your resume is packed with information and it can be tough to know where to start. A resume summary statement can be a great way to introduce yourself and highlight the skills and experiences that make you a great fit for the job you’re applying for. When written well, a summary can help to illustrate how your past experiences will help you in the role you’re hoping to land.

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